A Digital Nomad in the Heart of Europe: Prague Edition

A Digital Nomad in the Heart of Europe: Prague Edition

GUEST POST ON A DIGITAL NOMAD IN THE HEART OF EUROPE: PRAGUE EDITION BY REBECCA BROWN

Prague is a city quite unlike any other, a rare example of the perfect blend of history and 21st-century life. If you’re embracing the nomadic style of working and living, it should be your next destination. With an eatery or coffee shop around every corner and plenty of culture and history to soak up during leisure hours, you’ll never be short of something to do.

Without further ado, let’s jump right in and take a look at everything one of Europe’s greatest cities has to offer to a digital nomad:

Prague is a city quite unlike any other, a rare example of the perfect blend of history and 21st-century life. If you’re embracing the nomadic style of working and living, it should be your next destination. With an eatery or coffee shop around every corner and plenty of culture and history to soak up during leisure hours, you’ll never be short of something to do.

Without further ado, let’s jump right in and take a look at everything one of Europe’s greatest cities has to offer to a digital nomad:

Charles Bridge

Prague Charles Bridge

One of the main advantages of your nomadic lifestyle is that you can most often work your own hours, and use the rest of your time to truly get to know your current surrounding. And since you have chosen Prague as your home for the next little while, what better place to start exploring than the magnificent Charles Bridge. Dating back to the 14th century, this marvelous piece of architecture is everything you would expect from a city rich in tradition and steeped in culture.

Take a stroll across it first thing in the morning when the sun is coming up or late at night when it is beautifully illuminated and you’ll be able to really get a feel for the city. If you also happen to have a hot mug in your hand and a slice of cake, the experience will be just a bit better.

The bridge is your connection between the two halves of the city, and from it, you can see most of the important sites you will want to explore in the next few weeks.

Prague Castle

Prague Castle

Second on your list of must-see attractions has to be Prague Castle. If the walls of this architectural marvel could speak, they would be able to tell you centuries-worth of stories in a single afternoon. No matter where you look, you’ll see something unique and can learn more about the history of the city and the Czech Republic in general. You will need to pay a ticket to enter some of the museums, but most of the castle is yours to roam. Going on a local tour might help, if you want to learn more than the average tourist.

Old Town offers an unrivaled range of eclectic little eateries, so you’ll never have to make do with coffee and a Danish from Starbucks if you don’t want to. Exploring the winding side streets and hidden avenues is what makes this area of the city so fun to be in. For centuries it has been the beating heart of Prague, and it’s a place you’re sure to spend a lot of time in from the moment you set foot in it.

If you find a library or cafe nearby that is calm and quiet enough to allow you to get down to some serious work, you’ll be able to base your working days in the heart of the city. Working in such a magnificent setting might inspire you to turn more productive and allow you to finish earlier than usual, and you might as well make the most of your time there, and enjoy some of the gorgeous food that is on offer all around you. Czech cuisine is known for its sausages and soups, but you can also grab something much healthier and lighter. You will soon get the hang of the best local shops, but try to stay clear of the main square and the streets surrounding it, and venture a bit further into the maze, as this is where the best places are usually hiding.

Stay Round the Corner from Wenceslas Square

Wenceslas Square

The final thing to think about when it comes to setting up shop in Prague for a while is where you’re going to stay. Luxury hotels for one weekend are one thing, but if you plan to stay here a while, you will need to find a better option. You can also always choose to stay in a hostel, but that might not exactly be the best working environment.

Your best bet is to find a sublet for a few months, and AirBnB* can help you there. You can also browse some of the local forums, but they might not often be in English. Finding a place that is a hop and a skip from Wenceslas Square might be a good option, as you will be located quite strategically to embrace everything Prague has to offer.

On the other hand, you can choose to stay in a village near Prague, and go into the city for the day, but the better option is to stay in the city, or even in the suburbs. No matter which part of town you choose, there will be a glorious architectural wonder quite nearby, and you can use your commute to get some steps in and explore. While the public transportation system in the city is great, you are much better off walking.

Pack your bags and laptop and head on over to Prague, whose hundreds of spires will enchant you in no time.

PS: The link with an asterisk (*) is an affiliate link.

About the Author

Becca is an interpreter by day and mostly travels at night, can fall asleep on any means of transportation, and can most often be found either typing in a Starbucks, or armed with a backpack, ready to take on the latest in a series of hikes. You can read more of her exploits at RoughDraft.

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

MEXICO

Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

TARIFA

Spanien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

SPAIN

Nomad Pro Tip: Five Effective Ways for Beating Jet Lag

Nomad Pro Tip: Five Effective Ways for Beating Jet Lag

GUEST POST BY HANNAH PARKER – 5 WAYS FOR BEATING JET LAG

As a digital nomad, you will find yourself frequently traveling and changing locations all over the world. One of the downsides to having this lifestyle is the constant jet lag you get from traveling in dramatically different time zones. Lucky for you, we’ve got five effective ways for beating jet lag for you..

#1 Change Your Routine

One of the ways for beating jet lag starts before you start your trip: A few days before you leave, you need to make sure to change up your routine. You don’t need to change your entire schedule, but start eating and sleeping closer to when you would in the country you are visiting. Three to four days in advance is a sufficient amount of time to adjust to your destination. If you change up your routine to mirror what it will be like in the country you are going to, your jet lag might not be so burdensome.

 

#2 Arrive During the Day

The daytime is the optimal time to arrive at your destination. If you land during the nighttime, you will feel more inclined to sleep, and it will be harder for you to adjust to the new time zone. However, if you arrive during the day, you are more likely to push through the sleepiness and adventure around the city you’re staying in. Then when you are done exploring for the day, you will be wiped out and ready to sleep. Sunlight helps remind your body that you should be awake instead of sleeping, even if you really, really want to sleep. You will have an easier time to adjust to the new time zone this way, and it’ll be easier for you to shake off your jet lag.

 

#3 Avoid Caffeine and Sugar

One of the worst things you can do before flying is drinking lots of caffeinated beverages and eating loads of sugar. Coffee, soda, fried foods and sugary candies will keep you up and hyper on your flight, which will make it hard for you to sleep on your flight. To avoid jet lag once you land at your destination, you’ll want to sleep during the majority of your flight and caffeine won’t help. It will also make you feel groggy once you arrive at your destination and prolong the feeling of jet lag. So just this time, avoid the sugary foods and drinks and loads of caffeine and drink water instead.

 

#4 Take Melatonin

Sleep is the number one among the ways for beating jet lag when traveling, but falling asleep is not always the easiest thing to do when you are traveling. To avoid extreme jet lag and sleepiness once you arrive at your destination, take the sleeping drug Melatonin to help you sleep on your flight. The drug is the chemical that makes you fall asleep at night. and it’s natural, too. A plane is not always the easiest place to fall asleep on, especially with screaming babies and snoring dads surrounding you. Melatonin will help put you to sleep naturally, despite your surroundings. Only take a small dosage of the drug because you can end up feeling groggy if you take too much. The perfect amount to take on a long flight is 5mg of Melatonin. Any more than this amount will leave you feeling sleepy and possibly more jet lagged when you land.

 

#5 Leave a Day Early

Are you a relatively new traveler who gets really bad jet lag? The best way to avoid it and adjust your body to the new time zone is to travel a day earlier than you planned. You should book your flight a day early so that you have an entire day to sleep and rejuvenate. An extra day to relax will allow you to start your planned activities the next day without any feelings of exhaustion. You don’t want to start your trip off feeling wiped out and unrested. Trust us, it would most likely set your trip off on the wrong foot. So leave a day earlier than you planned, so you can enjoy your trip just the way you want to.

Conclusion – 5 Ways for Beating Jet Lag

Jet lag is something that most travelers have experienced, and it’s definitely a downer. But if you follow these 5 effective tips when traveling to a new location, you just might avoid it and start your trip off right.

About the Author – Hannah Parker

Hannah is a writer for trekbible and dreams of being an investigative journalist, or maybe a world traveling videographer, or perhaps the next voice of NPR; basically Hannah wants to be a multimedia journalist. Her voice is too big for her small body so she likes to stand on tall surfaces and shout very, very loudly. Hannah has many passions (some including poetry and the occasional chicken nugget or two) but is always searching for her next hobby.

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

HOUSE SITTING

TRAVEL HACKS

HOUSE SITTING

HOUSE SITTING

TRAVEL HACKS

ROUND THE WORLD TICKET FOR FREE

HOUSE SITTING

TRAVEL HACKS

ERROR FARE

Full-Time Travel: Nomadism Doesn’t Have to be Digital

Full-Time Travel: Nomadism Doesn’t Have to be Digital

GUEST POST BY PAM & ANGI ABOUT FULL-TIME TRAVEL

Nowadays the phrase “digital nomad” is a standard traveling around the world with your laptop and living a life that’s envied by many who remain home. At the same time though this term means that you inevitably have to work online to enable such a lifestyle.

And that’s exactly what puts lots of people off wandering the world – even if that’s their dream. Not everyone can and wants to work online. Many who have exactly that dream, carry out a job in which they don’t sit in front of a computer all day and live their life online.

Full-Time Travel

Unfortunately, these people are often being left out when it comes to introducing the subject of a location independent life. If you inform yourself about how to earn money while traveling or extending the length of your journey, you often just come across jobs such as blogger, copywriter, social media manager, translator, and virtual assistant. But what if I have no clue about those fields of work or none of it really interests you?

There are Other Ways of Nomadism

We had a critical look at exactly this subject and found out that the reality actually is quite a bit different. By no means, you have to work digital or online to travel the world. There are plenty of others ways to redesign your life while still being able to get away from it all. However, you may not find it proper to call yourself a “digital nomad” then.

Full-Time Travel

That’s how we felt. So a new term was needed. A phrase that implies that you’re on a trip – which doesn’t necessarily have to be a world trip. You’re on a journey trying to find out what makes you happy. And to find the one thing that motivates you every single day. Regardless of your full-time job and a system that prevents you from finding your own way.

From Full-Time Job to Full-Time Travel

Full-time travel is for normal people like you and me. They are on the verge though. On the verge from being employed to self-actualization. Either they have already quit their full-time job or are close to doing so. They don’t feel comfortable anymore or realize that there’s much more out there for them. That’s why they decide to go on a journey. A journey that allows them to figure out what they want for their future and how to get to that point.

Full-Time Travel

And as the name suggests, this part of the society loves full-time travel. To finance their journey, full-time travelers work along the way. Their journey is possible in all its facets and so is their work. Even though a few might still start their online business, others carry on a job locally as a barkeeper, nanny or farmer. Some work freelance and the rest for food and accommodation. And again others combine the analog with the digital.

The goal of a full-time traveler is to find his or her passion. Some might carry out a job for years but don’t really know where their strengths actually lie. But full-time travelers strive towards the top of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: self-actualisation. For the first time in their life, they have the time and the possibility to deal with their doing and being. They want to build their own system in which they can design their own future according to their own conditions and dreams. And during this journey, they’re setting the course of action for their full-time life.

And Where Can You Find the Analog in a Digital World?

There are many different platforms on which you can find all kinds of jobs to extend or even finance your travels. HelpX and workaway are only two of them. They focus on analog work for food and accommodation and offer jobs in almost every country on earth. You just apply for whatever catches your eye, wait for an answer from the host and begin to work. Easy as such.

Full-Time Travel

The advantage of analog freelance jobs is that you get in contact with local people all over the world. They make you feel as part of their community and you can actually make a difference with your work. For that, you receive the most valuable salary: gratitude and appreciation. And if with such work you even see a part of the world you haven’t seen before, that’s most certainly the absolute jackpot. At least in the eyes of a full-time traveler.

It’s Never Too Late to Start Your Own Full-Time Travel

With that said there’s just one more thing for the people who are still at home and are yearning a life according to their own conditions and vision: quit your full-time job and start your full-time travel to find what you’ve been looking for so long.

 

About the guest authors

Pam & Angi also call themselves full-time travelers. While being on the go since January 1, 2017 they try to combine work and travel. They talk about this and a lot more on Instagram – live and in color.

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

MEXICO

Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

TARIFA

Spanien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

SPAIN

Downsides of long-term traveling: why sometimes everything feels like shit

Downsides of long-term traveling: why sometimes everything feels like shit

The down sides of long-term traveling: why sometimes everything feels like shit

Well, now I said the bad word! Yes, there are things that simply are shit. Even my around-the-world-trip – currently full of beautiful beaches, palm trees, and coconuts – is not always a bowl of cherries. There ARE downsides of long-term traveling!

Don’t get me wrong: I love being on the road, discovering new countries and cultures, working remotely around the world, and being able to decide at any time to move on. This is the life I chose and I have not regretted it yet, not even for one second.

But for me, too, there are downsides of long-term traveling:

The longer I’m on the road the more often they come – those moments when you long for a hug of a beloved person.

Or you get to know somebody and immediately realize that you have to say good-bye again within a few hours or at the best days.

Or you go on a tour with many people and even though you just met it feels like you have known each other all your lives. Nevertheless, you are lonely because you realize that no matter how it feels those are not your real friends and will never be.

Now I am going tell you something really embarrassing:

When I arrived on Koh Samui I had one of those moments when I felt really lonely even though I was surrounded by people. Why? Because I just left my ‘new friends’ on Koh Phangan. We had such a great time together that mentally I was not ready yet to adapt to the next ‘friends’.

And now the embarrassing part: I talked to a friend about my feelings and he suggested:

‘Good that you are surrounded by many people. I would like you to approach them, explain your situation and ask one of them for a hug.’

Digital Nomads are known for leaving their comfort zones and this pretty much sounded like a workshop of this kind to me. So I thought that he might be right and it could be a good idea to make me feel better.

I have to admit that it took me about 15 minutes or maybe even longer to get to the point.

It was the shortest hug of my life. Afterwards I felt even lonelier because I realized that it was not an honest hug. It didn’t come from the heart.

It was stupid and embarrassing.

For the remaining evening and the next day I tried to steer clear of those guys to avoid re-living this embarrassment.

My conclusion of it?

To prevent the downsides of long-term traveling, after this around-the-world tour which ends in 34 days I will not travel for more than 4 months in a row anymore. In the end it is everybody’s own decision. I personally have the feeling that 3 to 4 months of traveling are the perfect time for me.

I am looking forward to being with my family again soon. Furthermore, I will visit a BarCamp for Translators and reunite with beloved colleagues and friends.

But since I know that sooner or later wanderlust would have drawn me away again anyway I already accepted a summer job. As a beach tester I will evaluate the beaches of Spain (and maybe Italy) and write reports about them. On the 1st of July it is going to start – not even 10 days after I return home.

Also for the time after I already made plans. Concrete and not so concrete ones. So be sure: the next long-term trip is just around the corner!

Yours Barbara

This blog post was translated by Carina Bäuerlein. The German travel blogger currently lives with her husband and son in Finland. On Odysseys of a Nomad she writes about her expat life combined with past and future traveler’s tales.

Did you like my blog post about the downsides of long-term traveling?

Then check out my ebook TRAVEL SOLO where I tell you how solo traveling made me grow in different ways and how you can, too!

TRAVEL SOLO

Immer wieder werde ich gefragt, ob ich nicht Angst hätte, allein zu reisen. Ob ich mich nicht unwohl fühle, immer wieder neue Orte zu erkunden anstatt ein echtes Zuhause zu haben. Meine Antwort darauf ist dieses E-Book. Nach über zwei Jahren allein reisen, kann ich aus voller Überzeugung sagen, dass ich es nicht nur liebe, Länder und Kulturen kennenzulernen, sondern auch dass ich daran gewachsen bin. Ich habe mich besser kennengelernt und Selbstbewusstsein, Vertrauen sowie Freiheit erlangt. Wenn du noch zweifelst, ob du den Schritt wagen sollst, ist dieses Buch perfekt für dich! Denn ich zeige dir, wie Soloreisen auch dich verändern kann…

How the trip around the world changed me

How the trip around the world changed me

How the trip around the world changed me

Before the world trip, I got told by a lot of people:

“You will come back as a different person!”

I always thought, I am gonna let them talk and will see for myself.

While I was on tour, from time to time I thought about if I am already “different” and the answer was always: No!

Now I am aware of the fact, that a world trip changes oneself. If you want or not.

I don’t know If I am a different person now but latest during the two weeks in Germany I recognized specific changes about myself:

#1 I have become more easy-going

If you have sat once in a bus in Sri Lanka, which only starts driving, when all seats are taken, you are never going to complain about 5 minutes delay by the train in your home country. Or if you have to pay one Euro in Bolivia to go to the toilet, where you have to scoop water out of a barrel in order to flush, which is so dirty that you don’t want to go near it, then you don’t mind the 50 Cents for Sanifair anymore. (Note: Sanifair is a system at motorway restaurants in Germany which disinfects all toilets after each use automatically).

#2 I am taking more care of myself

When I don’t do it, no one will, if I travel alone. Therefore, I started to listen to my body more and to behave in a way which makes me feel good. It was the logical consequence to say that I really want to enter the path of a digital nomad. Because if I am on the road, especially near the sea, I just feel better. Less headache, no more typewriter´s cramp and… suddenly I can sleep! Year after year I went from one doctor to another and always said the same: „I cannot sleep.” I could neither fall asleep, nor sleep through the night, nor was I well-rested in the mornings. A vicious circle. Which I can break through when I am traveling. I don’t know how, but that actually doesn’t matter. Because it is only important that I feel better, right?

Additionally, I started to meditate daily with the App “Headspace” when I was on my trip around the world.

I don’t succeed in concentrating every day for the full 15 minutes. But it is a start, isn’t it?

#3 I care more about the environment

It sounds weird, right? No one wants to see the ecological foot print of a digital nomad and world traveler, after all. But yes, I have seen how the most beautiful spots on our earth are smashed with trash. How it is not only the tourists but more the locals, who let their land be bogged in trash, without turning a hair. Plastic waste is thrown away carelessly, wherever you are. That is sad and makes me partially really angry. Cute and amazing animals die because they get entangled in plastic or swallow it and then suffocate torturous. The human anyways destroys so much. The single person has no influence on a lot of things but it has on one thing: Waste dump. Everyone is responsible on their own a little bit.

#4 I have become more minimalistic

I admit it: I love clothes and I love shoes. I am a woman after all and on top of that (half) Italian. Not a good combination, if you have a small wardrobe. If I had to mention a number, I would say, my closet was 6m in width before my trip around the world and take aside, that everything was jam-packed on the inside, the space between the wardrobes and the ceiling was filled with shoe cartons. You have to use your space after all. I sold, gifted or threw out a good third of it already before the world trip. During the ten days after the end of my world trip and my take off to test beaches in Spain I didn’t have much time, unfortunately. Nevertheless, I sold two big boxes with clothes and a gave one bag to the clothing drive. To be continued in September… But you can already see the difference.

#5 I am less consumption-based

Before I left for my world trip I couldn’t pass by a clothing store without going in there. Honestly. It was the worst with shoes. I simply bought new shoes despite of knowing that I am probably going to wear it only once. I didn’t care. Eventually I owned around 180 pairs of shoes. I don’t know exactly. I lost the overview three years ago after I had moved in my own flat and had a share of it in my flat and another much bigger part at my parents´ place. By now, I don’t set much value on it anymore. Of course, I got my favourite shoes, but not even those I could wear when I was at home those 10 days. First of all, I didn’t even have the time for so many different pairs of shoes and secondly, it had to be always comfortable actually, when I was on the road. I didn’t even get the opportunity to unpack the High Heels. Did I miss something? Not at all!

#6 I can enjoy beautiful moments more!

And again, this sounds absurd. I have experienced so many great moments in the last months, that one could think I would not even acknowledge them anymore. But the opposite is the case. A moment with strangers, a slice of delicious bread, a hot shower… It doesn’t matter if at home or in the big, wide world… When such a moment is there, then it is something extremely special, I pause and it feels like, the world stops for a second, so I can enjoy the moment a bit longer.

#7 I don’t have to be Everybody’s Darling anymore

In the past I always tried to please everybody… even strangers! Now I want to please myself. I don’t want to have a headache anymore. I don’t want to split myself in half. I want to be happy! And I know now how that works. Those are definitely the good news. The bad news is that one or the other will not like this. But I don’t care anymore now…

Those are seven changes.

I certainly think, that I am still myself.

I think, I have grown and have become more matured as a result of the trip around the world.

But from now on it is: Looking forward and not living in the past anymore! Are you going to join me?

Yours Barbara

This blog post was translated by Alex Zuber.