Indonesia for Digital Nomads

Indonesia for Digital Nomads

Indonesia for Digital Nomads

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Facts About Indonesia

Indonesia has begun to emerge as an economic power in Southeast Asia, as well as a newly democratic nation. Its long history as the source of spices coveted around the world shaped Indonesia into the multi-ethnic and religiously diverse nation that we see today. Although this diversity causes friction at times, Indonesia has the potential to become a major world power.

The Republic of Indonesia is a large archipelago located between the Southeast Asian peninsula and Australia, between the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Indonesia borders Malaysia on the island of Borneo, Papua New Guinea on the island of New Guinea and East Timor on the island of Timor. It is home to over 258 million people. It is the fourth most populous nation on Earth after China, India and the US.

The official language, Bahasa Indonesia – a dialect of Malay – is spoken by almost everybody, although local dialects are usually the primary language.

Information About Entry and Departure

You don’t need a visa to enter Indonesia for visits of up to 30 days, calculated to include your date of arrival and date of departure. Visa-free visits can’t be extended or transferred to another type of visa.

Upon departing, airport tax is included in the cost of your ticket for all domestic flights within Indonesia.

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Safety

It’s important to note that, compared with many places in the world, Indonesia is fairly safe. There are some hassles from the avaricious, but most visitors face many more dangers at home. Petty theft occurs, but it is not prevalent.

Money

The official currency of Indonesia is the Rupiah, also known in currency offices as IDR.

Whether or not other currencies can be used varies from business to business. Large hotels and tourist stores may accept other currencies such as U.S. dollars. However, expect to generally end up paying more to use your foreign currency.

Credit and debit cards can be used in larger stores, restaurants and hotels in Indonesia. Though it’s still worth carrying cash for smaller transactions at cafes and markets or if you travel to some rural areas.

WI-FI

In recent years, the availability and speed of broadband connections in Indonesia have improved dramatically, since the introduction of 4G and fibre optics. WiFi is easily available in hotels and cafes, and typical connection speed for WiFi  512kbps – 2mbps some providers can offer higher speeds.

Mobile Internet

If you want a SIM Card for your phone, you can get one directly at the airport when you arrive (it’s a Telkomsel booth and will cost about 250,000 Rupiah (around 25 US Dollar) for the SIM Card plus 10 GB LTE). If you are willing to wait, you can also get one in town for around 100,000 Rupiah (10 US Dollar) for up to 35 GB. The best-known carriers are Indosat, Telkomsel (SimPATI) and XL Axiata.

MiFi

Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

Living in Indonesia as a Digital Nomad

Space is at a premium in Jakarta so expect to pay a lot more if wanting a house with a garden in an expat area. Most people opt to live in apartments. Expats can be expected to pay up to two years cash in advance for rental property so they should choose wisely and do their research. If choosing to live in an expat area be prepared to pay a lot more than if living amongst the indigenous population. In major Indonesian cities, traffic can be horrific so, ideally, expats should try to live somewhere that is as close to work as possible.

Taxis are abundant and ridiculously cheap compared to the West, and if tipping well the driver will wait for passengers while they do their shopping. It is very uncommon for expats to drive in Jakarta and most people employ a driver. A good driver is worth it as they have knowledge of all the side streets to make traveling around more bearable. Having a driver in the West would be considered a luxury; in Indonesia, it is a part of life for most people with a stable income. However, in Bali, it’s a different story. The so-called taxi mafia is taking care of prices to be pretty high, especially when compared to Uber prices. Unfortunately, those apps are prohibited and in case you do choose to call an Uber / Grab / GoJek, you risk having your driver beaten up by taxi drivers. So, my recommendation is to get the number of one (or more) driver, which you call directly when you need to go somewhere special. But you should definitely get a scooter to be independent and travel wherever you wish on your own.

Eating out is very cheap if alcohol is not included. Shopping for local fresh products in the markets and warungs – local restaurants with a kind of buffet – is fun and there are great bargains to be found. If buying locally and skipping the supermarkets, one can live very cheaply and healthy.

Coworking Spaces

Hubud– Hubud is Bali’s first coworking space, located in the beautiful Ubud in the uplands of Bali. Globally renowned for yoga, holistic healing, organic food and stunning scenery. The coworking space is well-known for its strong sense of community, and collaborative environment.

Outpost– Outpost is a collaborative, productive community. Our coworking/coliving facilities and services are uniquely-tailored for individuals and groups seeking to immerse themselves in developing a new concept or grow existing ideas.

Blog Posts About Indonesia

 

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20 important words/sentences in Indonesian:

HelloHalo
YesIya nih
NoTidak
Thank you!Terima kasih!
PleaseSilahkan
Excuse me…Permisi…
Where is …?Dimana….?
My name is …?Nama saya adalah ….?
I don’t speak IndonesianSaya tidak berbicara bahasa indonesia.
Do you speak English?Apakah Anda berbicara bahasa Inggris?
I’m German.Saya dari jerman.
Could you help me?Dingin kau membantuku?
I need …Saya butuh ….
HungryLapar
ThirstyHaus
WaterAir
How much is this?Berapa banyak ini??
BeachPantai
MallPusat perbelanjaan
HospitalRsud

The Numbers in Indonesia

1Satu
2Dua
3Tiga
4Empat
5Lima
6Enam
7Tujuh
8Delapan
9Sembilan
10Sepuluh
11Sebelas
12Duabelas
13Tigabelas
14Empatbelas
15Limabelas
16Enambelas
17Tujubelas
18Delapanbelas
19Sembilanbelas
20Dua puluh
30Tiga puluh
40Empat puluh
50Lima puluh
60Enam puluh
70Tujuh puluh
80Delapan puluh
90Sembilan puluh
100Satu ratus
1.000Satu ribu
1.000.000Satu juta

The Indonesian Guides for Digital Nomads

Live Like a Local

Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in Indonesia?

You should check out the guides below!

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

VIETNAM
Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

SINGAPORE
Spanien für digitale Nomaden
DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
MALAYSIA

Thailand for Digital Nomads

Thailand for Digital Nomads

Thailand for Digital Nomads

For me, Thailand is simply the best country for digital nomads. Why? Because for me here is the ideal relationship between all the factors I take into consideration when I choose a place: Internet, location, community, cost of living, infrastructure, Kizomba.

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Facts About Thailand

Once known as Siam, the Kingdom of Thailand is a long, skinny country running over 1,400 miles in length from top to toe. It shares borders with Myanmar (Burma), Laos, Cambodia, and Malaysia. The capital is Bangkok.

The official language is Thai. Most professionals speak English, and most expats who live in recognized expat and tourist areas don’t bother to learn the language. However, don’t expect to find too many English speakers if you go “up country” into rural regions such as Isaan.

Thailand has the last decades become a very popular tourist destination. A country that you just ‘have to’ visit if you enjoy traveling. The tourism has increased, but it is not hard at all to find a beach or a park where you can relax without crowds of people. As a matter of fact, it is still possible to find a beach where you can be on your own!

In Thailand you will find some of the most beautiful islands and beaches in the world. Koh Samui, Koh Lanta, Koh Phi Phi, Phuket, Krabi and Hua Hin are destinations that we have to mention. The scuba diving on Koh Tao and Similan island is simply world class and sports as golf, tennis, kayaking, canoeing, windsurfing etc. will help You to stay in great shape, if You get bored at beach activities.

Information About Entry and Departure

Your tourist visa options when visiting Thailand by air are as follows:

  • Visa Exemption / Visa Waiver Entry
  • Visa on Arrival
  • Single Entry Tourist Visa (SETV) aka “60 day tourist visa”
  • Multiple Entry Tourist Visa (METV) aka “6 month multi entry visa”

Which visa is the right one for you depends on your nationality and on your needs. Most countries in Europe and the US are visa exempt and only get a stamp in their passport. This is free of charge. If you want to stay longer than 30 days though you have to get a paid visa.

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Safety

Thailand is generally a safe country to visit, but it’s smart to exercise caution, especially when it comes to dealing with strangers (both Thai and foreigners) and travelling alone.

Money

International hotels and larger businesses in Thailand accept major credit cards. Despite protest from credit card companies, many establishments, such as supermarkets and department stores, add a 3% to 5% surcharge for payment by credit card (this is above and beyond any fees levied by your credit card company). Be sure to ask before handing over your card, and keep all receipts.

Some travelers like to change a little money before leaving home, though it is not really necessary. You can sometimes buy Thai Baht at your local American Express or Thomas Cook office or order Baht at your bank; however, it is much easier to visit an airport exchange booth or ATM on arrival in Thailand. There are exchange kiosks at most international airport arrival halls in Thailand, which are generally open when flights arrive, but don’t rely on them being open 24 hours.

But to be honest, I always simply withdraw money at the ATM and never had a problem in Thailand. Be aware though that most ATMs have a 200 Baht service fee.

WI-FI

Internet access is good in Bangkok and Chiang Mai but can be slow in other parts.

Wifi is available in most cafés, restaurants, malls and hotels and also the Internet speed is OK. There are several cellular companies operating in Thailand and they also give you good wireless Internet access.

If speed is important for you, use the free wifi networks of the cellular companies. Also the cellular Internet itself is pretty fast, as long as you are within your Data usage.

Wi-Fi speed in cafés and hotels varies from place to place.

    Mobile Internet

    In Thailand, it’s easy and cheap to get a SIM card with data. When arriving, you will most likely find yourself in Bangkok’s international airport Suvarnabhumi. I would strongly advise you to buy your SIM as soon as you exit Arrivals. If you don’t exit in Bangkok just get one at the airport in Chiang Mai.

    There are three main operators:

    • AIS
    • True
    • DTAC

    I always recommend to get AIS. They have great coverage and you can add the so called Super Wi-Fi to your normal data plan (if you’re getting unlimited data; Super Wi-Fi is included with limited data plans). The Super Wi-Fi allows you to get high speed internet all over Thailand through the AIS hotspots.

    MiFi

    Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

    Living in Thailand as a Digital Nomad

    The cost of living in Thailand is cheap when compared with many other countries throughout the world. When it comes to property, location is the key and the cost of property will vary enormously according to where you wish to live. Despite this, rent is generally cheap when compared with western nations.

    Expatriates observe a big difference in the price of Thai and western food here. The local restaurants are extremely cheap and the majority of local people eat out on a daily basis because it is cheaper than cooking at home. The price of western food, however, will largely be on a par with the price of food in the west. Wine is very expensive here but beer and local spirits can be purchased at a very low price.

    The principal language spoken in Thailand is Thai, with significant minorities speaking Chinese, Lao, Khmer and Malay. A large percentage of the Thai population speaks English.

    The transport network in Thailand is quite dense and can take you almost anywhere in the country at least by bus. Bus is the most popular mean of transport and the most used by Thai people. The train serves the four cardinal points but not all major cities. There are no train to popular tourist destinations such as Phuket and Sukhothai.

    Coworking Spaces

    If you like working from coworking spaces, you will have no problems in Thailand. There are almost everywhere and the prices are relatively humane.

    Here, for example, are two coworking spaces in the nomadic hubs Koh Lanta, Bangkok, and Chiang Mai.

    KoHub

    Kohub is situated on the beautiful tropical island of Koh Lanta in southern Thailand and only a 40-minute speedboat trip from the popular Phi Phi Islands. Beautiful white sand beaches offer great snorkeling, diving and many other great local activities, such as Maui Thai and yoga. There’s also an abundance of local bars and events, it’s the perfect place to get some work done and enjoy the tropical lifestyle.

    CAMP

    CAMP is my favorite coworking space in Chiang Mai. Located directly in Maya Mall, it is in the heart of the digital nomad center. So if you’re in the popular Nimman or Santhitam neighborhoods, you can even walk there at best. There are no memberships here. You simply order your drink or lunch at the bar and get a code for the Internet that is valid for two hours. However, if you can use the Wi-Fi hotspot of your mobile phone operator: This is much faster and unlimited.

    The Hive / Hubba

    I’m a fan of the coworking space chain The Hive. Already in Saigon and Singapore, I have been working from there. I like the cozy atmosphere and the many activities. But if you want to use your free days of the Nomad List Membership when in Bangkok, you can do it in the Coworking Space Hubba.

     

    Blog Posts About Thailand

    I have been to Thailand well 10 times now. Unfortunately, I haven’t written that many blog posts but there are many more to come! Just stay tuned…

    Bangkok – City of Angels

    Bangkok – City of Angels

    Not only Los Angeles is called The City of Angels, but also the Thai capital Bangkok - at least the Thai call it by that name. I arrived at the early evening at the airport and made my way to the hostel. Changed trains once and the rest of the way by Tuk Tuk. Not that...

    20 important words/sentences in Thai:

    HelloSà wàtdii
    YesChì
    NoMai
    Thank you!Koopkhun
    PleaseKruṇā
    Excuse me…chan khothot khrup…
    Where is …?yùu tîi-nǎi
    My name is …?pŏm chêu
    I don’t speak Thaiphoot Thai mai dai
    Do you speak English?Kun pood paasaa anggrit dai mai

     

    I’m from GermanyC̄hạn mā cāk pratheṣ̄ yexrmạn
    Could you help me?Choo-ay dai ma
    I need …Toi can.
    HungryHiu
    ThirstyHiu naam
    WaterNaam
    How much is this?Taorai
    BeachChāyh̄ād
    Shopping CenterH̄̂āng s̄rrph s̄inkĥā
    HospitalRong phyābāl

    The Numbers in Thai

    1Noeng
    2Soong
    3Saam
    4Sie
    5Haa
    6Hok
    7Tjed
    8Peid
    9Kaauw
    10Sib
    11Sibed
    12Sibsoong
    13Sibsaam
    14Sibsie
    15Sibhaa

     

    16Sibhok
    17Sibtied
    18Sibpied
    19Sibkaauw
    20Jiesib
    30Saamsib
    40Siesib
    50Haasib
    60Hoksib
    70Tjedsib
    80Piedsib
    90Kaauwsib
    100Noengrooj
    1.000Noengphan
    1.000.000Noenglaan

    The Chiang Mai Guide for Digital Nomads

    Chiang Mai Guide for Digital Nomads

    Live Like a Local

    Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in South East Asia? You should check out the world's digital nomad capital Chiang Mai!

    Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

    You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

    Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    VIETNAM

    Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    SINGAPORE

    Spanien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    MALAYSIA

    Vietnam for Digital Nomads

    Vietnam for Digital Nomads

    Vietnam for Digital Nomads

    I had heard of many nomads who chose Ho Chi Minh City / Saigon as their base. Personally, I was a bit hesitant to go there because I’m not a big fan of big cities (except from Singapore, New York, and Rio de Janeiro). But then I saw a House Sit there and thought that this would be the perfect chance to check it out. I ended up staying 6 weeks and coming back a few times afterwards. It’s still not my favorite country, I have to say. I prefer Singapore, Chiang Mai or Bali. But Vietnam is definitely worth trying out.

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    Facts About Vietnam

    Vietnam is a long, narrow nation shaped like the letter s. It is in Southeast Asia on the eastern edge of the peninsula known as Indochina. Its neighbors include China to the north and Laos and Cambodia to the west. The South China Sea lies to the east and south. The mountains of the Annam Cordillera rise over most of the western side of Vietnam, while a thousand-mile (1,600-kilometer) coastline dominates the east.

    Japan took control briefly during World War II, and when the war ended with Japan’s defeat in 1945, Ho Chi Minh, the leader of the Vietnamese Communist Party, declared Vietnam an independent nation. French attempts to retake Vietnam led to war with the communist Vietnamese, called Viet Minh. Fighting ended in 1954 with the partition of the country into communist North and non-communist South Vietnam.

    In 1973 a “third” Vietnam war began—a continuation, actually—between North and South Vietnam but without significant U.S. involvement. It ended with communist victory in April 1975.

    Information About Entry and Departure

    In order to enter Vietnam, you will need a valid passport with at least six months validity remaining and a Vietnamese visa, a visa exemption document, or a written approval letter for a visa upon arrival. You may obtain a visa or a visa exemption document from a Vietnamese embassy or consulate prior to traveling to Vietnam.

    Some countries are allowed to stay visa-free for a certain amount of time. For Germany, it’s 15 days. Check if your country of origin is one of them and you might be able to get into Vietnam without a visa. But bear in mind that you will then need a return ticket to prove that you will leave the country in time.

    If you are planning to leave Vietnam and re-enter from another country, be sure that your visa is multiple entry. If it is only single entry, you will have to obtain another visa prior to returning to Vietnam.

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    Safety

    Vietnam is a relatively safe country for visitors, including women travelling alone. In fact, given the country’s recent history, many tourists, particularly Americans, are pleasantly surprised at the warm reception that foreign travellers receive. That said, petty crime is on the rise though in a small scale and shouldn’t be a problem if you take precautions. Generally, the hassles you’ll encounter will be coping with pushy vendors and beggars.

    Money

    The currency in Vietnam is called Dong (VND). One USD is approximately worth 23,000 VND.

    Banks and airport money changers can change your money at a high cost, so it pays to ask around before trading dollars for dong. You’re certain to find an ATM to withdraw from in any of Vietnam’s major cities. Cash rules in Vietnam, though credit cards are accepted in many restaurants, hotels, and shops in Vietnam’s big cities.

    WI-FI

    Internet and wifi is widely available throughout Vietnam. Something like 98% of hotels and guesthouses have wi-fi, only in very remote places (such as national parks) is it not standard. Wifi is almost always free of charge. Many cafes and restaurants also have (free) wifi. Connection speeds are normally good. Internet cafes are also available costing 3000d to 8000d per hour.

    Vietnam’s average internet connection speed clocked at only 5.1 megabits per second, ranking 64th globally and near the bottom in the Asia Pacific region.

    Mobile Internet

    A Vietnamese SIM card can be found anywhere on the streets on carts, at any phone shop, credit kiosk and at the airport on arrival. The most common networks are Viettel Mobile, MobiFone (my network) and Vinaphone.

    It should cost no more than 100,000 VND (5 USD) for a prepaid SIM. Data packages also cost around 100,000 VND and give you enough Gigabyte to get by. During my last stay I got a promotion package for 100,000 VND, which gave me 6GB per day for 10 days. Just ask around and you will find the package for your needs.

    MiFi

    Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

    Living in Vietnam as a Digital Nomad

    If you are staying for a month or more, it’s worth renting a house or (less common) apartment. It’s much cheaper to look around when you arrive. Prices start from $300 a month, but you might get lucky and find somewhere cheaper.

    Cyclos, or bicycle rickshaws, are available in many towns, though they’ve been banned in some more congested cities. Drivers have a tendency to ask for outrageous sums. Negotiate fiercely, and settle on a price for your destination before climbing aboard.

    Xe om are motorbike taxis, which scoot around in many cities. As with the cyclos, negotiate and agree on a price before taking off.

    Taxis are available in major cities, though drivers may be reluctant to use meters, and some meters are tampered with to rack up charges faster than they should. Because of taxi issues, particularly if you’re exhausted after a long flight, you might want to consider booking an airport pick-up through either your hotel or a tour company.

    The country boasts one of the most diverse, delicious and healthy gastronomies in the world. The main ingredients used in Vietnamese food are rice and its derivatives, fish sauce and vegetable. Thanks to Vietnam´s tropical climate, the long coast and the gigantic range of mountain, Vietnam is blessed with numerous varieties of plants.

    Coworking Spaces

    The Hive Saigon

    I was quite happy with my membership at The Hive in District 2. They not only have a beautiful and cozy space with a rooftop to chill on at sunset or whenever you need a break, but they also have a great community that immediately made me feel welcome

     

    HanoiHub

    HanoiHub has two locations: one at Lang Ha Street and the other one at Huynh Thuc Khang Street. It’s spacious, but still cosy with yellow and red interiors. They have so called “energetic zones” and quiet areas to choose depending on your needs when working.

    .

     

    the Hub Da Nang

    the HUB is a co-working space in Da Nang creating a community for businesses and nomads in Da Nang. If you want to work in a space where you have everything you need and also a creative environment of like-minded people, the Hub might be the best place for you. 

    Blog Posts About Vietnam

    I published a few blog posts about places I have visited in Vietnam:

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    20 important words/sentences in Vietnamese:

    HelloXin chao
    YesVang
    NoKhong
    Thank you!Cam o’n!
    PleaseXin vui long
    Excuse me…Xin loi
    Where is …?O’ dau….?
    My name is …?Toi ten la ….?
    I don’t speak VietnameseToi khong noi duoc tieng viet.
    Do you speak English?Ban co noi tieng anh khong?
    I’m German.Toi den tu duc.
    Could you help me?Ban co the giup toi?
    I need …Toi can….
    HungryDoi bung
    ThirstyKhat
    WaterNuoc
    How much is this?Cai nay bao nhieu?
    BeachBai bien
    MallTrung tam mua sam
    HospitalBenh vien

    The Numbers in Vietnamese

    1mot
    2hai
    3ba
    4bon
    5go
    6nam
    7sau
    8tam
    9chin
    10muoi
    11muoi mot
    12muoi hai
    13muoi ba
    14muoi bon
    15muoi lam
    16muoi sau
    17muoi bay
    18muoi tam
    19muoi chin
    20hai muoi
    30ba muoi
    40bon muoi
    50nam muoi
    60sau muoi
    70bay muoi
    80tam muoi
    90chin muoi
    100mot tram
    1.000mot ngan
    1.000.000mot trieu

    The Saigon Guide for Digital Nomads

    Saigon Guide for Digital Nomads

    Live Like a Local

    Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in South East Asia? You should check out Saigon!

    Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

    You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

    Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    THAILAND

    Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    SINGAPORE

    Spanien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    MALAYSIA

    Japan for Digital Nomads

    Japan for Digital Nomads

    Japan for Digital Nomads

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    Facts About Japan

    Japan is an archipelago of some 6,852 islands located in a volcanic zone on the Pacific Ring of Fire. A nearly continuous series of ocean trenches, volcanic arcs and shifting tectonic plates, the Pacific Ring of Fire accounts for more than 75 percent of the world’s active volcanoes and 90 percent of the world’s earthquakes.

    Japan’s four main islands, Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu and Shikoku, make up 97 percent of the country’s total land area. Honshu is home to Tokyo and many of Japan’s other largest cities, including Yokahama, Osaka, Nagoya, Kobe, Kyoto, Kawasaki, Saitama, Hiroshima and Sendai.

    Hokkaido, the second largest Japanese island and northernmost prefecture, accounts for nearly a quarter of Japan’s arable land.  Hokkaido leads Japan’s other 46 prefectures in the production of seafood and a host of agricultural products, including soybeans (the key ingredient for tofu and all things miso), wheat, corn, beef and raw milk.  Sapporo, Hokkaido’s capital and largest city, hosts the annual Sapporo Snow Festival, which regularly draws more than 2 million visitors to the spectacular exhibition of some 400 snow and ice sculptures.

    Kyushu, the third largest and most southern of Japan’s four main islands, is the site of Japan’s most active volcano, Mt. Aso, and several cities with important historical, political and commercial significance, including Nagasaki, Kagoshima and Fukuoka.

    Information About Entry and Departure

    When you enter Japan, you have to go through immigration clearance by presenting necessary documents, your passport and visa (if required) to receive landing cards at an airport or a port.

    When you leave Japan, you have to get confirmation of departure from an immigration inspector at an airport or a port. It’s not to restrict you from leaving Japan but to have a record of people leaving the country. If you have documents such as a visa and so on at that time, the documents are collected so your resident status and residence period disappears. Those who received a re-entry permit (including a special re-entry permit) before leaving Japan can retain their resident status and residence period if they re-enter Japan within the valid period.

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    Safety

    Crime levels are low in Japan. It is generally safe to walk about at night and to travel on public transport, but you should maintain the same level of vigilance as you would at home and take sensible precautions.

    Money

    It may surprise you to learn that an incredibly modern country like Japan is in some ways quite old fashioned when it comes to money.

    Not only is the use of cash extremely prevalent, but in many places credit cards are simply not accepted. And to further complicate things, ATM machines that work with non-Japanese credit or debit cards can be hard to find, particularly in rural areas.

    It’s recommended obtaining some local Japanese yen from your local bank before leaving for Japan. While there is no guarantee that you will get the best rate, it should be comparable – and it saves you the time and hassle of exchanging currency after you arrive in Japan.

    WI-FI

    Both paid and free wireless (Wi-Fi) hotspots are available across Japan that laptops, smartphones and other mobile devices can use to connect to the internet, especially around airports, train stations, convenience storesrestaurants, coffee shops and bars.

    Japan came is the third quickest internet speed with a peak download speed of 42.2 Mbps, and can download one HD movie in 106 seconds.

      Mobile Internet

      You’ll need an unlocked smartphone or device to use a prepaid SIM. You should be able to configure the APN settings yourself. Note, however, that if you buy your SIM at Bic Camera, they will do the installation and setup for Y480.

      There are two major prepaid data-only SIM cards available to travelers in Japan:

      • IIJmio Japan Travel SIM
      • B Mobile Visitor SIM

      It has recently become possible to purchase prepaid voice/data SIM cards in Japan. These cards are called the B-Mobile PayG Sim. They cost Y9,980 are good for one week from the date of activation. They include 60 minutes of domestic and international calls and 3G of data. They can be purchased online and then delivered to your first night’s hotel. You can also purchase them in person at Yodobashi Camera Stores in Japan. Once you receive the card, you must upload your passport photo and visa page in order to activate the card. If the passport photo page does not show your address, you must also upload an official document showing your address (like a driver’s license). Thus, these cards are a little fiddly to use, but they are the only way for tourists to get prepaid voice SIMs in Japan.

      MiFi

      Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

      Living in Japan as a Digital Nomad

      Depends on what area of Japan you find yourself living in, but on the whole, Japanese housing is going to be a bit smaller and a bit less cushy than what you’re used to. Out in more rural areas, you might get lucky and find a place of decent size, but most often you’ll be housed in a bit smaller place than what you’re used to.

      Japanese public transport is great! In Europe and different nations, it’s presumably truly great too, yet the Japanese have truly got it under control. Their metro and system are helpful, precise, and makes getting around the nation so substantially less demanding

      Japanese cuisine offers an abundance of gastronomical delights with a boundless variety of regional and seasonal dishes as well as international cuisine. Restaurants range from mobile food stands to centuries old ryotei, atmospheric drinking places, seasonally erected terraces over rivers, cheap chain shops and unique theme restaurants about ninja and robots. Many restaurants are specialized in a single type of dish, while others offer a variety of dishes.

      Coworking Spaces

      Osakan Space– Located in the heart of Osaka’s bustling business district, with many local eats and even a Starbucks, all within a few minute’s walk. Osakan Space is one of Osaka’s hippest shared working spaces.

      Featuring a stylish open plan coworking area with many hot desks and comfortable chairs, perfect for having a chat, collaborating and sharing ideas with other like-minded coworkers.

      20 important words/sentences in Japanese

      HelloKonnichiwa
      YesHai
      NoTe
      Thank you!Arigato!
      PleaseOnegaishimasu
      Excuse me…Sumimasen…
      Where is …?Doko desu ka …?
      My name is …?Watashinonamaeha ….?
      I don’t speak JapaneseWatashi wa nihongo
      Do you speak English?Eigo o hanesemasu ka?
      I’m German.Watashi wa doitsu shusshindesu.
      Could you help me?Watashitachi o tetsudatte kuremasu ka?
      I need …Watashi wa woshii ….
      HungryKufuku no
      ThirstyNodo ga kawai
      WaterMizu
      How much is this?Kore was ikuradesu ka?
      BeachBichi
      MallShoppingusenta
      HospitalByoin

      The Numbers in Japanese

      1ichi
      2ni
      3san
      4yon
      5go
      6roku
      7nana
      8hachi
      9kyuu
      10juu
      11juuichi
      12juuni
      13juusan
      14juushi
      15juugo
      16juuroko
      17juushichi
      18juuchachi
      19juuku
      20nijuu
      30sanjuu
      40yonjuu
      50gojuu
      60rokujuu
      70nanajuu
      80hachijuu
      90kyuujuu
      100hyaku
      1.000juu-man
      1.000.000hyaku-man

      The Tokyo Guide for Digital Nomads

      Tokyo Guide for Digital Nomads

      Live Like a Local

      Are you still searching for a place for digital nomads in Asia that is not as mainstream as Bali or Chiang Mai?

      What about Tokyo?

      Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

      Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

      VIETNAM
      Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

      SINGAPORE
      Spanien für digitale Nomaden
      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
      MALAYSIA

      Singapore for Digital Nomads

      Singapore for Digital Nomads

      Singapore for Digital Nomads

      Singapore has been on my bucket list for quite some time. When I got a House Sit there for over three weeks in 2017, I could hardly believe my luck. In the meantime, I have been to the Southeast Asian metropolis several times and it fascinates me again and again. I especially love the mix between East and West, between city and nature, between so many different cultures.

      Singapore for Digital Nomads

      p

      Facts About Singapore

      Though physically small, Singapore is an economic giant. It has been Southeast Asia’s most modern city for over a century. The city blends Malay, Chinese, Arab, Indian and English cultures and religions. Its unique ethnic tapestry affords visitors a wide array of sightseeing and culinary opportunities from which to choose.

      Because of its efficient and determined government, Singapore has become a flourishing country that excels in trade and tourism and is a model to developing nations. The capital city, also called Singapore, covers about a third of the area of the main island.

      Singapore’s progress over the past three decades has been remarkable, yet the island has not been overwhelmed by development. Visitors will discover a wealth of historical treasures from the past, in the beauty of older buildings, values and traditions that have survived in the face of profound social and geographical change.

      Information About Entry and Departure

      You must present yourself for immigration clearance at your point of entry into Singapore. You must satisfy the following basic requirements before you can be considered for entry:

      • A passport that is valid for at least six months
      • Sufficient funds for the length of your intended stay
      • A completed Disembarkation/Embarkation Card (D/E Card)
      • A valid Singapore visa
      • A confirmed onward or return ticket
      • Evidence that you can enter your next destination (for example, a visa)
      • A Yellow Fever Vaccination Certificate, if applicable

      When you leave Singapore, hand the embarkation portion to the ICA officer. If you have lost it, inform an ICA officer at your point of departure.

      q

      Safety

      Singapore is literally one of the safest countries on earth! It’s very unlikely you will see or experience any type of crime. I walk around alone day and night. Once, talking to a local, I started a sentence with “I’m afraid…” and he immediately said “No need to be afraid in Singapore! Even at night, you will always be safe!” What I was actually trying to say was, “I’m afraid to lose my phone, and I forgot how to get back to my apartment.”

      Money

      Major card brands are widely accepted in Singapore, but some merchants will charge a surcharge. ATMs in Singapore will accept the major brands Visa, Mastercard and American Express. As for travel money cards, most of them support SGD but may not be the most secure option because they don’t have your name on the card.

      WI-FI

      Singapore has one of the fastest internet speed in the world, so you will be able to work out of your accommodation without the need for a coworking space.

      Wi-Fi hotspots are also widely available at various public areas in Singapore. To locate the wifi hotspot, look out for the Wireless@SG decal on display wherever this network is available, as well as the SSID Wireless@SG on your device. You will first need to register for an account with your foreign mobile number at any Wireless@SG hotspot to receive your login details via an SMS message.

      Mobile Internet

      Buying a SIM card in Singapore is as easy as walking into a gas station, grocery store, post office, or phone shop. All you have to do is select the SIM card you want, present your passport, and pick a phone number, which is then registered with your passport details.

      Singapore has three major telecommunications companies that provide prepaid SIM cards: M1, Singtel, and StarHub. Each offers SIM cards ranging from $5 – $50 for voice + text with enough data (usually 5MB to 30MB) for casual email checking. Of course, you can also get bigger data packages – depending on your needs.

      MiFi

      Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

      Living in Singapore as a Digital Nomad

      Singapore is one of the world’s most affluent countries and as such offers its visitors a very high standard of living. From the modern transportation system in the form of an extensive MTR network to one of the world’s fastest internet speeds, Singapore embodies efficiency and has everything to help you be as productive as possible. However, all the comforts of the big metropolis come at a price – Singapore has topped the list of the world’s most expensive places to live in for four years running, from 2013 to 2017.

      There’s an insane amount of great food to try in Singapore. It is such an incredibly diverse country with so many ethnicities and countries represented, each with their own distinct flavors and restaurants. Most of the food groups in Singapore are Chinese, Indian, and local Malay, but there are also some good restaurants that serve Western food and dishes from around the globe.

      Coworking Spaces

      The Hive

      The Hive is probably Singapore’s most active coworking space – at least based on the three I have tested. They have morning yoga and events almost every evening: from conversation nights over movie screenings to social parties. The workspace is spread over five levels and the highlight is the rooftop, which is great for working in the fresh air or just taking in the view for a moment’s distraction.

       

      Collision 8

      Thanks to its amazing location in the Central Bank District, Collision 8 has the best view! Make sure you check it out yourself in this guide’s free photo guide. You can overlook the entire Marina Bay Skyline from the space’s main area. The offices around it are designed in a very creative way – everyone in a different, soothing style. This is the space for you if you’re searching for a community, workspace, and events.

       

      The Co.

      The Co is the smallest and coziest coworking space I’ve seen – yet with a premium look in black and white. The 8-story building is located right in the heart of downtown. They have a second space in Singapore (Duxton Road) with similar accommodations.

       

      Blog Posts About Singapore

      While in Singapore, I went exploring the city several times. My favorite part of this metropolis is the nature. But just click through my blog posts yourself and come with me to see the city through my eyes:

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      Singapore conquered my heart in no time and my feel like being home. Maybe you will feel the same?!

       

      The Singapore Guide for Digital Nomads

      Singapore Guide for Digital Nomads

      Live Like a Local

      Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in South East Asia? You should check out Singapore!

      Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

      You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

      Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

      VIETNAM

      Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

      THAILAND

      Spanien für digitale Nomaden

      DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

      MALAYSIA

      Malaysia for Digital Nomads – An Underrated Country in South East Asia

      Malaysia for Digital Nomads – An Underrated Country in South East Asia

      Malaysia for Digital Nomads – An Underrated Country in South East Asia

      Malaysia for digital nomads? I’ve been to Kuala Lumpur twice this year and I’m planning to return to Malaysia to get to know other parts soon – most of all Penang with the old town Georgetown, which I hear is beautiful and awesome for expats and digital nomads. I really liked that it’s a melting pot and therefor an open-minded country.

      p

      Facts About Malaysia

      The climate in Malaysia is tropical, warm and sunny, but with abundant rainfall. The most rain falls during the northeast monsoon between October and March.

      Malaysia is a bit of a mix between the two countries it’s nestled between: Singapore and Thailand. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, with its famous twin towers, which are the highest in the world, and impressive malls, has many modern aspects similar to Singapore.

       

      But Malaysia isn’t as expensive as Singapore. The prices are more comparable to Thailand. Additionally, Malaysia has a range of beautiful islands that are worth a visit.

      Because the country is so multi-cultural, people are very open-minded and welcoming. There is no racism, no discrimination, no prejudice against other lifestyles. This is one of the reasons why it is a perfect place for digital nomads. Even if you’re not surrounded by other nomads the whole time, you will not feel like an alien because of your “strange idea of working while traveling.”

      The majority of the country is Muslim. You should get informed about local traditions, customs, laws and religions and always respect them. This is especially important during the holy month of Ramadan, other religious festivals or if you want to visit a religious site.

      Another advantage is the (almost) lack of a language barrier. Although not the official language (which is Bahasa Melayu), English is spoken by almost everybody. When I asked an UBER driver in Kuala Lumpur why, he was surprised and just said, “Well, we just speak English all the time! We have to speak it well.”

      For me, all this makes Malaysia a destination worth a closer look and a longer stay than just a one-day visa run to Kuala Lumpur.

      Information About Entry and Departure

      Most nationalities can enter Malaysia without a visa. Depending on where you’re from, you will be allowed to stay for 15 days, 30 days or three months without visa-free. Most European countries and the USA are exempt from visa requirements when visiting for vacation or social reasons.

      If your nationality is not exempt and you are required to apply for a visa, you’ll have to do it from your home country before hitting the road.

      Regardless of visa requirements, remember that your passport needs to be valid for six months after your departure date. If it’s not, the airline may not allow you to board the plane or immigration authorities may not allow you to enter Malaysia.

      There are no arrival cards to complete, but you will have to give your fingerprint.

      q

      Safety

      Government pages warn tourists about an ongoing risk in different areas. They write about a high risk in coastal areas of eastern Sabah (from Kudat to Tawau, including Sandakan, Lahad Datu, Kunak and Semporna, including the offshore islands and dive sites) of being kidnapped and advise against all non-essential travels to these areas. Also, they write about a heightened threat of terrorism in the major cities. Last but not least, I read that it’s advised not to cross the border between Thailand and Malaysia by land although I was talking to locals myself and they told me that it’s safe!

      Money

      The currency in Malaysia is the Ringgit (MYR), which is divided into 100 Sen. The exchange rate fluctuates constantly, but at the moment (July 2017) 4 Ringgit are worth about 1 US Dollar.

      Almost every ATM accepts withdrawal by credit card, and ATMs are everywhere, but there may be fees.

      Beware of scammers trying to clone your card and empty your bank account. The only solution is to be prepared with several credit cards ready – just in case!

      If you want to exchange cash, you also have to be careful not to get ripped off!

      WI-FI

      Wi-Fi in Malaysia is not the best. You will probably have ok Wi-Fi at your Airbnb, hotel or hostel. If you choose to try one, your coworking space will definitely have good Wi-Fi. But in general, I was pretty disappointed by Wi-Fi in KL and had much better connections in Bali, Thailand, and Singapore.

      My conclusion: If you rely on stable and fast internet, I recommend you not use WI-FI.

        Mobile Internet

        There are four main operators in Malaysia: Celcom (Xpax), Maxis (Hotlink), DiGi and U Mobile. There are also a few more carriers that only operate on their own 4G/LTE networks, but they only work in parts of the country, which is why I strongly recommend you stick to one of these four providers. I personally chose a Hotlink SIM Card when I arrived at the airport.

        Coverage can be pretty good in most areas of the peninsula, but it’s very patchy, even on 2G, on remote islands or Borneo.

        If you don’t get your prepaid card right at the airport, you should be able to get one at a Maxis retailer or a convenience store such as 7-Eleven. You can get the starter pack labeled FAST for 10 Ringgit with 5 Ringgit of credit valid for 5 days and 300 MB data valid for 3 days. I got a tourist package at the airport for about 50 Ringgit with 5 GB valid for two weeks.

        MiFi

        Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

        Living in Malaysia as a Digital Nomad

        Airbnb*, hostels*, and hotels* are all great options for short term stays. Prices vary based on amenities and location. Dorm beds typically start from 15 Ringgit per night, while an Airbnb apartment rental in or around Kuala Lumpur will start from 30 Ringgit per night, although you can get better deals for longer stays. If you want to try House Sitting*: Go for it! I saw many opportunities for a month in KL or Penang in the past and will definitely try to get a house sitting gig myself next time I’ll be there.

        For intercity travel, the bus is the best option. In the metropolitan areas of the country, you can use Uber* without a problem. For a 30 minute ride, it would come to about 15 Ringgit. In places where they don’t have Uber your best bet would be a scooter. You can rent one for little money.

        Coworking Spaces

        There are plenty of coworking spaces in the main areas: Kuala Lumpur and Penang are full of coworking spaces and cafés to work from. You can check them out here: All coworking spaces in Malaysia. I was working from home or from coworking cafés in case I wanted to change my working environment.

        Blog Posts About Malaysia

        I have been to Kuala Lumpur twice and definitely want to go back to see more of this beautiful country! I think Malaysia should be more in the center of attention of digital nomads. It’s a beautiful country, where you can live a perfect work-life-balance!

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        20 Word/Phrases, That Will be Useful for Digital Nomads in Malaysia

        HelloHello
        YesYa
        NoTidak
        Thank you!Terima Kasih!
        PleaseSila
        Excuse me…Maafkan saya… (also means forgive me)
        Where is …?Di mana….?
        My name is …?Name saya ….?
        I don’t speak MalaysianSaya tidak faham..bahasa Melayu. (don’t understand)
        Do you speak English?Kamu faham bahasa English? (understand)

         

        I’m German.Saya orang German. (people)
        Could you help me?Bolehkah kamu tolong saya?
        I need …Saya perlu ….
        HungryLapar
        ThirstyDahaga
        WaterAir (pronounced as Ayeh)
        How much is this?Ini harga berapa?
        BeachPantai
        MallPusat Membeli-belah (or just say Shopping Mall)
        HospitalHospital

         

        The Numbers in Bahasa Melayu

        1satu
        2dua
        3tiga
        4empat
        5lima
        6enam
        7tujuh
        8lapan
        9sembilan
        10sepuluh
        11sebelas
        12Dua belas
        13Tiga belas
        14Empat belas
        15Lima belas
        16Enam belas
        17Tujuh belas
        18Lapan belas
        19Sembilan belas
        20Dua puluh
        30Tiga puluh
        40Empat puluh
        50Lima puluh
        60Enam puluh
        70Tujuh puluh
        80Lapan puluh
        90Sembilan puluh
        100Satu ratus
        1.000Satu ribu
        1.000.000Satu juta

        The Kuala Lumpur Guide for Digital Nomads

        Kuala Lumpur Guide for Digital Nomads

        Live Like a Local

        Du suchst nach einem coolen Spot für digitale Nomaden in Südostasien? Dann solltest du dir unbedingt Kuala Lumpur anschauen! 

         

        Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

        You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

        Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

        DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

        VIETNAM
        Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

        DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

        SINGAPORE
        Spanien für digitale Nomaden
        DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
        THAILAND