Brazil for Digital Nomads

Brazil for Digital Nomads

Destinations for Nomads

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Facts about Brazil

Brazil is a great country for digital nomads and long-term travelers. On the one hand, there is so much to see here that you are really busy for a long time if you want to get to know the country properly. On the other hand, the infrastructure and the price-performance ratio are quite good by Latin American standards. Nevertheless, Brazil is not yet flooded with tourists (tourism accounts for only 0.5 percent of the gross national product), so you can still enjoy the many breathtaking places without crowds.

The country has 200 million inhabitants and an area of over 8 million square kilometers. It is the fifth largest country in the world (both in terms of area and population density). With the exception of Chile and Ecuador, it has a border with every country in South America and occupies almost 50 percent of the entire continent.

It is the only country in the region where Portuguese is the national language. However, Brazilian Portuguese differs from European Portuguese in pronunciation, grammar and spelling. Although there are almost 200 languages in Brazil, Portuguese is the only official language.

Much of the country is covered with rainforest, the beating heart of which is the Amazon, which has the greatest biodiversity in the world. However, most people live along the coastline of the Atlantic Ocean.

Information About Entry and Departure

Passport

German citizens can simply enter Brazil with a passport valid for at least six months and stay in the country for up to three months.

Immigration Card

Before arrival, an immigration card must be completed, which can be obtained on board of the means of entry (plane, ship, bus). This card must be kept for the duration of the stay and returned on departure. If you lose your card, you will be fined. If you are staying for more than three months, you must apply for a visa.

Vaccinations

In general, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs recommends the standard vaccinations according to the vaccination calendar of the Robert Koch Institute. Yellow fever vaccinations are not required if you are coming from Germany, but may be required by third countries if you have entered yellow fever areas (especially around the Amazon) during your stay in Brazil.

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Safety in Brazil

Brazil is by far not as safe as Western Europe. Crime is particularly high in the large cities of Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Recife and Fortaleza, and especially in the favelas, the slums, there are frequent attacks and assaults. That does not mean that it is dangerous everywhere! There are even favelas that are safe to enter. In Rio, my hostel was in a slum and I didn’t even notice it. However, increased vigilance is appropriate throughout Brazil – this is also recommended by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs – and you should try not to have all your valuables with you or not to show them. So you should avoid walking around with your mobile phone in your hand.

Money and Currency in Brazil

The currency is the Brazilian Real (BRL). In December 2015, 1 euro was worth 4.3 real. The current exchange rate can be easily checked online. I use an app called XE Currency.

The best bank to withdraw money from is Banco do Brasil. It accepts all major credit cards. However, it is advisable to have credit cards from different providers in Brazil, as not every bank accepts every card. I often had problems withdrawing money with VISA and had to use my Mastercard.

WiFi

I won’t lie to you: The WiFi speed in Brazil is very patchy! If you have projects where you have large uploads or downloads, you should be prepared to create a hotspot with your mobile phone. In Recife, I stayed at a friend’s house where at least the download speed was acceptable. In hotels, hostels and other places you can’t necessarily assume that. If you find a place where you can work well, I advise you: Stay there ;) At the next place it can be quite different again…

Mobile Internet

The mobile network in Brazil is organized by state. So if you arrive in Salvador like me on my second trip, then you travel on to Recife, you are in another state and there are always extra charges for calls and SMS. If you only need your SIM card for data volume, this does not apply to you.

There are different networks. The best known providers are Oí, Vivo and Tim (note: the Brazilian pronunciation is “Chim”). The easiest way to get a SIM card is to go to a shop in a shopping mall. If you’re lucky, it works just like that. However, if you are unlucky, you will be asked for the so-called CPF. This is the Brazilian tax number that only Brazilians and foreigners with a visa have. However, they are very open about it here and a polite request with a nice smile can actually lead to a Brazilian – even if you don’t know him or her – giving you his CPF number.

Normally, the SIM card including one gigabyte of data volume should not cost you more than 50 BRL, so depending on the exchange rate a maximum of 12 euros.

MiFi

Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

Living in Brazil as a Digital Nomad

Airbnb*, Hostels* and Hotelsare all great options for short term stays. Prices vary based on amenities and location. You can get a hostel dorm bed, even in places like Rio de Janeiro for less than 10 Euro.

In general, I think Brazil is a great place of you’re looking for a perfect work-life-balance. It offers you the possibility to enjoy the beach and do watersports every day, go hiking in breathtaking nature escapes as often as you want, explore remote areas like the Amazon, and still have communities of other nomads around you so you get work done.

Blog Posts About Brazil

I have been to Brazil three times so far. Unfortunately, it was before I started writing in English, which is why the posts that I wrote are all in German only:

Morro de São Paulo

Morro de São Paulo

Morro de São Paulo... Bei den Worten mag so mancher an die anonyme Großstadt São Paulo denken, die das erste Ziel meiner Weltreise war, die ich im November 2014 angetreten habe. Aber weit gefehlt! Denn Morro de São Paulo hat nichts mit der Stadt im Süden Brasiliens zu...

Gruß aus Pipa

Gruß aus Pipa

Letzte Woche ist einer meiner größten Träume wahr geworden: In Pipa bin ich mit frei lebenden Delfinen geschwommen! Nicht umsonst stand das auch ganz oben auf meiner Bucket List... Pipa ist ein zuckersüßes Örtchen etwa 80 Kilometer südlich von Natal im tropischen...

Gruß aus Rio

Gruß aus Rio

Rio raubt Dir den Atem!   Obwohl Rio de Janeiro eine echte Großstadt ist, hatte ich nicht wirklich das Gefühl in einer zu sein. Es gibt so viele Grünflächen, so viele grüne Hügel und so viel Sand, Strand und Meer. Die Copacabana Die Copacabana ist einer der...

20 Useful Words / Phrases in Portuguese

Hello
YesSim
NoNão
Thanks

Obrigado (Men)/Obrigada (Women)

PleasePor favor
Excuse meDesculpa
Where is …?

Onde é ….?

My name is …?

O meu nome é ….?

I don’t speak PortugueseEu (não) falo português. 
Do you speak English?Você fala inglês?  
I’m from Germany.Sou da Alemanha.
Could you help me?

Você pode me ajudar.

I need …Eu preciso ….
HungryFome
ThirstySede
WaterÁgua
How much is this?

Quanto é isso? / Qual é o preço? / Quanto custa?

BeachA Praia
Shopping mallO shopping
HospitalHospital

The Numbers 

1um/uma
2dois/duas
3três
4quatro
5cinco
6seis
7sete
8oito
9nove
10dez
11onze
12doze
13treze
14catorze
15quinze

 

16dezesseis
17dezessete
18dezoito
19dezenove
20vinte
30trinta
40quarenta
50cinquenta
60sessenta
70settenta
80oitenta
90noventa
100cem / cento
1.000mil
1.000.000um milhão

 

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

VIETNAM

Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

SINGAPORE

Spanien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

MALAYSIA

Israel for Digital Nomads

Israel for Digital Nomads

Destinations for Nomads

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Facts About the Israel

Israel lies on the Mediterranean Sea and borders Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, the West Bank, and Gaza. It was proclaimed a representative democracy in 1948. Geographically it belongs to the Middle East, while geologically it is still part of Africa. There are different classifications of the regions of Israel, but my information, which comes from the Israeli Tourism Board, is: There are eight regions, namely (1) the Golan Heights, (2) the Galilee, (3) Haifa & the north coast, (4) Tel Aviv, (5) Jerusalem, (6) the Dead Sea, (7) the Negev desert and (8) Eilat. Israel is undoubtedly a great country. Although I have often read that it is a good country to start with for backpackers, I wouldn’t agree with that 100%. What makes traveling difficult, for example, is that not everything is always written in English on the signs. One is therefore dependent on asking, since no dictionary helps with Hebrew writing. Fortunately, almost everyone here speaks English. I also find it quite intimidating for a start that all the young people are walking around in military uniforms and many even have their machine guns with them. In addition, the infrastructure is fine, but not necessarily well suited for backpackers. You have to change trains or buses often and have to deal with long waiting times, where you have the problem with the Hebrew characters again. For digital nomads, however, who stay in one place as soon as they feel comfortable somewhere, it’s different though. I can very well imagine enjoying the inspiring Golan Heights for weeks or even months, strolling through the multicultural city of Jerusalem every day, or finding my place in the heat of the desert.

 

Information About Entry and Departure

Israel has an agreement with many countries for visa exemption. Check on the website of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs whether your country has one, too. If you are exempt, you’re allowed to stay in the country for 90 days. Please note that you will get an arrival card, which needs to be returned when leaving and which states that you’re not allowed to work. Furthermore, you will have to show it when checking in at a hotel. At least that’s what I had to do at Abraham Hostel. Just a few words regarding immigration: I’ve been three times to Israel now and, to be honest, they gave me hard time every single time. And it’s not getting better but worse. So be prepared to have several checks of your backs, to take out everything, to find your checked back being opened, and lastly being interrogated for up to three hours. I’m not going to lie: It’s no fun. So, maybe it’s wise to plan longer trips only that compensate the effort of getting in the country in the first place. If the country where your passport was issued has no exemption agreement with Israel, there are several other possibilities. The most probable one is for you to get a so-called visitor’s visa.

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Safety

During my whole time in Israel I felt always safe and comfortable. but I don’t want to conceil that it it can become dangerous in some way. 

In the south you should keep away from the border to Gaza. There the rocket attacks become more frequent. Due to the good missile defense system some people even live there.

 

Money

The currency in Israel is the Shekel (NIS). The abbreviation NIS is derived from New Israeli Shekel. 1 Euro is about 4.3 shekels. One shekel is divided into 100 agorot. I’ve heard that there are 1 and 5 agorot but the only thing you see all the time is the 10 agorot coin. Pretty much every ATM accepts withdrawal by credit card. Normally, you’ll have to pay a fee, in most cases, maximum 10 Shekel.

WI-FI

Although I found several sources saying that internet in Israel is 30 Mbits download speed on average, I can’t confirm that from my experience. Maybe this is for internet via cable only. The fastest Wi-Fi I have tested in Tel Aviv, for example, was 28 Mbits download. But I have to admit that in terms of availability, Israel is showing best practice. There are free Wi-Fi hotspots all over the cities, almost every café offers free internet access, and on the trains, there is Wi-Fi, too.

Mobile Internet

There are three historical network operators in Israel that offer prepaid:

  • Cellcom
  • Partner (formerly Orange)
  • Pelephone

In addition, there are 5 MVNOs offering prepaid options:

  • Hot Mobile (rebranding in Altice)
  • 019
  • Rami Levy
  • Golan Telecom
  • 012 Mobile

Hot Mobile and 019 are longer part of the market and therefore easier to find. I had Cellcom during my first two stays in Israel and have 019 at the moment. I paid 83 Shekels for unlimited calls, SMS, and 20 GB of data. The speed test is showing me around 30 Mbits for download as well as for upload speed. But to be honest, Youtube videos are very often not loading and calls over WhatsApp are not the best. As for now, I would be hesitant to recommend this place for somebody who is dependent on very fast and stable internet.

MiFi

Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

Living in Israel as a Digital Nomad

I spent most of my time in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. Both locations are great for digital nomads who are looking for a good infrastructure, prefer to work in coworking spaces or want to go to a different café with Wi-Fi every day. Other places are definitely no less beautiful, but often offer little or no opportunities to bring variety into the home office or the work-life balance.

Coworking Spaces

There are numerous coworking spaces in both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Chains like Mind Space and We Work have settled here and offer you a workplace in the heart of these exciting places.

Blog Posts About Israel

I have been to Israel three times now and have visited almost all the well-known places from north to south. 

Eine Rundreise durch Israel

Eine Rundreise durch Israel

Im Januar und Februar habe ich eine Rundreise durch Israel gemacht. Ein atemberaubendes Land, das mich mit seiner landschaftlichen Schönheit, mit seinen wundervollen und offenen Menschen und aufgrund seiner traurigen Geschichte in seinen Bann gezogen hat. Meine ersten...

12 important words/sentences in Hebrew:

HelloShalom (on Fridays and Saturdays: Shabbat Shalom)
YesKen
NoLo
Thank you!Tudah!
You’re welcomeBewakascha
Excuse me…

Slicha...

Where is …?Eifo …?
My name is …Kor-im li …
I don’t speak Hebrew.Ani lo modvr / modvrt evrit.
I’m German.Ani esrach germani.
I need … Ani rutseh bewakascha / ani rutsah bewakascha …
How much is this?Kam auleh?

 

The Numbers in Hebrew

1akhat
2shtaym
3shalosh
4arba
5khamesh

 

6shesh
7sheva
8shmunhy
9teysha
10eshir

 

Have you been to Israel? If not, it should definitely be on your bucket list. The country is really breathtakingly beautiful and offers a lot for nature lovers as well as for culture fans. I fell in love with this country and I will surely come back and stay longer…

The Tel Aviv Guide for Digital Nomads

Tel Aviv Guide for Digital Nomads

Live Like a Local

Du suchst noch nach einem coolen Spot für digitale Nomaden im Nahen Osten? Dann solltest du dir Tel Aviv nicht entgehen lassen!

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

These blog posts could also be interesting for you:

Nablus und Jenin Tour
MIDDLE EAST
NABLUS AND JENIN
Masada
MIDDLE EAST
MASADA
MIDDLE EAST
BEST OF THE WESTBANK

Germany for Digital Nomads

Germany for Digital Nomads

Destinations for Nomads

With a German father, I grew up in Germany and spent most of my life in and around Frankfurt. That’s why I was always more attracted to foreign countries and I didn’t write a single blog post about my home country for the first 4 years as a blogger. Then, I started writing about Frankfurt and a little bit about Berlin and published the Frankfurt Guide for Digital Nomads.

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Facts About Germany

Germany has the largest population of any country in western Europe and also the largest economy. 

Berlin is the country’s capital city and seat of government. As a federal republic, Germany is divided into 16 federal states. Each state is responsible for setting its own policies and laws in specific fields, such as education and culture.

Germany has nine direct neighbours: Denmark to the north, the Netherlands and Belgium to the northwest, France and Luxembourg to the west, Austria and Switzerland to the south, and the Czech Republic and Poland to the east.

The country is well known for automobiles, cultural museums, world’s best beer varieties and large number of varieties in breads.

Information About Entry and Departure

Entering Germany is usually a very straightforward procedure. If you’re from any other Schengen country you can simply enter with your ID card.

If you’re coming in from non-Schengen countries, full border procedures apply. In case you have a passport from a non-Schengen country you will need to apply for a Schengen visa. The shortest one allows you to stay in the Schengen area for three months over a period of 180 days. After that, you will have to leave the Schengen area for three months before you will be able to apply for another Schengen visa.

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Safety

Worrying about safety and crime in Germany is a natural concern for digital nomads who are unfamiliar with the country. Germany is generally a safe country, and while crime in Germany exists, it is rather low-scale.

Money

Germany’s currency is the Euro. One Euro is divided into 100 Eurocents or simply Cents. The exchange rate fluctuates constantly, but at the moment, 1,15 Euro is worth about 1 US Dollar.

Visa and Mastercard are accepted in Germany. You can also use American Express and Diners Club credit cards; however, they’re accepted in fewer locations. While Germany ranks highly in Europe for the acceptance of new technology like contactless and mobile payments, it’s still a cash economy and you will probably notice that many businesses do not accept credit cards.

WI-FI

Germany offers the average Internet speed of 18.8Mbps. Free Wi-Fi access is a bit more complicated. There was a law called Störerhaftung that said that any Wi-Fi network provider is liable for all the illegal activity taking place on the network. Although this law is no longer active it still significantly limits open wireless networks in cafés and coffee shops. With that said, there are over 33,000 Wi-Fi hotspots spread across 300 German cities provided by decentralised organisations.

Mobile Internet

There are three main phone service providers in Germany, and who you choose depends on what you’re planning to do, where you’re planning to go, and your budget. These three companies are Deutsche Telekom, Vodafone, and O2.

As part of the activation process, customers are now required to provide an ID for all prepaid SIM registrations.

The cost of a SIM card can be as little or as much as you’d like to pay, depending on the number of calls and data you need. “All-Net-Flat” packages cost around 20 Euros and allow unlimited calls within Germany, 5GB of data (including LTE) and free EU Roaming. 

MiFi

Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

Living in Germany as a Digital Nomad

Compared to other Western European countries, the cost of living in Germany is quite reasonable. The prices for food, accommodation, clothing, cultural events, etc. are basically in line with the EU average. The largest expense is your monthly rent, which can be relatively high when you want to stay in the hotspots Berlin, Hamburg, Munich or Frankfurt

In Germany’s urban areas and along railroad lines which connect bigger cities, public transport is a quite comprehensive and efficient system. Because even smaller towns are connected quite well to public transport, you might even be able to do without a car. Public transport in Germany usually includes trams, buses, underground trains, and suburban express trains in large urban areas. Note that there are specific networks or associations for the public transport network, called Verkehrsverbund, that take care of the infrastructure and also the ticketing. If you want to get the app to buy tickets or check the timetable you need the app of the specific network of the area you’re at. For Frankfurt and surroundings, it’s the RMV, for Berlin it’s the BVG.

Germans love a good night out, and if you’re in any major city you won’t struggle to find a club. Berlin is considered by many to be the best clubbing city in Europe. The best-known club in the city is the Berghain & Panorama Bar, fitted with an incredible sound system and using it to blast the finest techno all night long. It attracts top DJs every weekend. Salon zur Wilden Renate is like a hedonistic circus, with multiple dance floors and a full-size labyrinth, and Stattbad combines partying with art exhibitions and other cultural displays.

Coworking Spaces

Weserland: Located in wonderful Neukölln, Weserland is a creative, active and collaborative shared space. For those seeking a unique coworking space, Weserland is where it’s at. Open 24/7 throughout the whole year, they simply do not have a restrictive opening or closing time.

Betahaus Hamburg: Slightly hidden away in the beautiful district of St. Pauli, you will find the Betahaus Hamburg. The space opened in July of 2010, right next to the “Schilleroper”, and it is the second Betahaus that was built after it’s comrade in Berlin.

Co-work & Play: Co-work & Play is a creative space located in the far east end of Frankfurt. While the day rate is a lot higher than some other spaces, the space offers over 70 flex-desks for customers to choose from and with so many work stations it is easy to find availability.

Blog Posts About Germany

I Being German, I have been to quite a lot of places in the country. But I haven’t written about many of them. In fact, I have only blog posts about my home town Frankfurt, the surrounding area of the Rhine Main Area, and about the Vienna House Andel’s in Berlin.

The Vienna House Easy Berlin

The Vienna House Easy Berlin

This year, I went for the fourth time to ITB – the International Tourism Fair & Exhibition in Berlin. After testing the Vienna House Andel's Berlin last year, it was now its little sister's turn – the Vienna House Easy. I came directly from an event in Sweden to...

20 Useful Words / Phrases for Digital Nomads in Germany

HelloHallo
YesJa
NoNein
Thank you!Danke!
PleaseBitte
Excuse me…Entschuldigung…
Where is …?Wo ist….?
My name is …?Ich heiße ….?
I don’t speak GermanIch spreche kein Deutsch.
Do you speak English?Sprechen Sie Deutsch?

 

I’m not from Germany.Ich bin nicht aus Deutschland.
Could you help me?Könnten Sie mir helfen?
I need …Ich brauche ….
HungryHunger
ThirstyDurst
WaterWasser
How much is this?Wie viel kostet das?
BeachStrand
MallEinkaufszentrum
HospitalKrankenhaus

 

The Numbers in Germany 

1eins
2zwei
3drei
4vier
5fünf
6sechs
7sieben
8acht
9neun
10zehn
11elf
12zwölf
13dreizehn
14vierzehn
15fünfzehn

 

16sechszehn
17siebzehn
18achtzehn
19neunzehn
20zwanzig
30dreißig
40vierzig
50fünfzig
60sechzig
70siebzig
80achtzig
90neunzig
100hundert
1.000tausend
1.000.000eine Millionen

 

Want to Learn German?

Would you like to learn German to get around more easily? Get in touch and take private lessons with me!

If you want to learn more than 20 sentences or word plus some numbers, you can book a customized language course with me. I will teach you everything you want to know in a personalized skype course.

The Frankfurt Guide for Digital Nomads

Frankfurt Guide for Digital Nomads

Live Like a Local

Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in Europe? You should check out Frankfurt in Germany!

Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

ROMANIA
Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

ITALY
Spanien für digitale Nomaden
DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
SPAIN

Romania for Digital Nomads

Romania for Digital Nomads

Destinations for Nomads

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Facts About Romania

The name “Romania” comes from the Latin word “Romanus” which means “citizen of the Roman Empire”. Romania is situated in the southeastern part of Central Europe and shares borders with Hungary to the northwest, Serbia to the southwest, Bulgaria to the south, the Black Sea and Ukraine to the southeast and to the north and the Republic of Moldova to the east. Roughly the size of Oregon, Romania is the second largest country in the area, after Poland.

Officially, Bucharest has been the capital of Romania since 1862, unofficially, since the end of 1859, when many foreign chancelleries moved their headquarters to Bucharest. Today, it is by far the largest city in Romania with a population of 2 million people.

Foreign visitors consider Romanians among the friendliest and most hospitable people on earth, as you will have the opportunity to discover on your tours in Romania. Romanians are by nature fun-loving, warm, hospitable, playful, with an innate sense of humor.

Things for which Romania is famous include: the Carpathian mountains, sculptor Constantin Brancusi, wine, salt mines, George Enescu, medieval fortresses, Eugene Ionesco, Dacia cars, and Dracula.

Information About Entry and Departure

A valid passport is required for all overseas/ non-EU visitors. Your passport must be valid for the entire duration of your visit.

For stays longer than 90 days visitors need to need to apply for a temporary residence permit (either before arriving into Romania or at least 30 days before the 90-day “no visa” stay expires).

Citizens of the European Union countries can enter Romania with a valid passport or with their National Identity Card.

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Safety

Although violent crime against tourists is almost non-existent. Visitors should take customary steps to safeguard their valuables. Leave your valuables and passport in a safety deposit box or use a money belt kept out of sight. Be aware of pickpockets and scam artists in major cities.

Money

Romania’s currency is Leu (plural “Lei” – pronunciation: lay). Foreign currencies may be exchanged at banks or authorized exchange offices (called: “casa de schimb” or “birou de schimb valutar”). International airports and larger hotels also offer currency exchange services.

ATM machines are available at main banks and at airports and shopping centers. Although there are very few ATMs in remote areas or villages.

Major credit cards including American Express, Mastercard and Visa are accepted in large hotels, car rental companies, and stores in the main cities. However, credit cards are unlikely to prove useful in small towns or away from tourist areas

WI-FI

Romania is known for having one of the fastest WiFi in Europe. Ranked in the top 10 in the world and 1st in Europe in terms of average Internet peak connection speed. 

Wifi is readily available pretty much anywhere like cafes, pubs, and even in public places.

    Mobile Internet

    You can purchase a prepaid SIM card with 2,000 local minutes/SMS and 9GB of domestic data for 10 Euros ($11.83 USD). Note that the Romanian network operators advertise their prices in euros, but the local currency is the Romanian Leu.

    Some of the popular cell phone carriers in Romania are the following:

    • Orange
    • Vodafone
    • Telekom
    • Digi Mobil

     

    MiFi

    Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

    Living in Romania as a Digital Nomad

    Airbnb*, hostels, and hotels are all great options for short term stays. Prices vary based on amenities and location. I was staying in Bucharest at an Airbnb for 10 Euro per night.

    Romanians are friendly and open and foreigners are usually made very welcome. Chatting with visitors is very common for Romanians and they will find a way to communicate with you even if they cannot speak your language.

    For a studio apartment or a one bedroom, the price is around 200-250 euros per month. Naturally, cheaper apartments will be smaller and perhaps not as renovated. Also if you live in the center of town, apartments will be pricier than those further away from the city center.  

    Bucharest has a very dense network of transportation with buses and trams. The only problem is to figure out where the stops are and when the bus will arrive, which can be random sometimes. You’d probably rather stay next to a metro station and use the subway (15€ for a monthly card) or taxi (0,30€ / km) or Uber.

    Regarding entertainment, there are lots of cool bars, concerts, events, sightseeing and more than meets the eye. Just start with a pint of beer in the center (around 2€)

    Coworking Spaces

    Commons Unirii: Commons is a dynamic network of fully-serviced coworking spaces. Our informal lounge-like offices provide the perfect backdrop for creative and professional excellence while our vibrant and diverse community of Commoners offers exposure to like-minded people from all industries.

    TechHub Bucharest: Helping startups get better faster, TechHub is no stand-alone operation. It is an international network of nurturing likeminded TECH entrepreneurs and providing the spaces for them to work, meet, collaborate, network, learn and have a bit of fun along the way.

    Impact Hub: With more than 50 spaces, Impact Hub is one of the biggest chains of coworking spaces in the world. The space consists of a huge area with an event space and many meeting rooms around the sides.

    Blog Posts About Romania

    Unfortunately, I have only checked out Bucharest since I was doing research for my City Guide for Digital Nomads. But I had one guest blogger who wrote about places outside of Buchaest:

    20 Useful Words / Phrases for Digital Nomads in Romania

    Hellobuna
    Yesda
    Nonu
    Thank you!Mulțumiri!
    PleaseVă rog
    Excuse me…Scuzati-ma
    Where is …?Unde este….?
    My name is …?Numele meu este ….?
    I don’t speak RomanianEu nu vorbesc limba română.
    Do you speak English?Vorbesti engleza?

     

    I’m German.Sunt din Germania.
    Could you help me?Ai putea sa ma ajuti?
    I need …am nevoie ….
    Hungryflămând
    Thirstyînsetat
    Waterapă
    How much is this?Cât de mult costă aceasta?
    Beachplajă
    Mallcentru comercial
    Hospitalspital

     

    The Numbers in Romanian 

    1un
    2doi
    3trei
    4patru
    5sinsi
    6șase
    7șapte
    8opt
    9nouă
    10zece
    11unsprezece
    12doisprezece
    13treisprezece
    14paisprezece
    15cincisprezece

     

    16șaisprezece
    17șaptesprezece
    18optsprezece
    19nouăsprezece
    20douăzeci
    30treizeci
    40patruzeci
    50cincizeci
    60șaizeci
    70șaptezeci
    80optzeci
    90nouăzeci
    100o sută
    1.000o mie
    1.000.000un million

     

    The Bucharest Guide for Digital Nomads

    Bucharest Guide for Digital Nomads

    Live Like a Local

    Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in Europe? You should check out Bucharest in Romania!

    Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

    Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    HUNGARY
    Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    GERMANY

    Spanien für digitale Nomaden
    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
    SPAIN

    UAE for Digital Nomads

    UAE for Digital Nomads

    Destinations for Nomads

    p

    Facts About the UAE

    In recent years, the United Arab Emirates have experienced a new boom after the first one at the time of oil discovery in its territories. The new boom is represented by the remarkable economic growth that affected the pan-economic sectors of the country and helped to set up free zones in the different emirates.

    The geographic nature of the state has significantly contributed in enhancing the state’s economy in terms of entry and exit, and this naturally encouraged the re-export process and boosted the position of some of the Emirates, which are now considered a transit route for various goods, and this has activated the navy and airports in the country as well as it has encouraged many international companies to take Emirates as a regional base, raising the proportion of the issuance of professional or business licenses.

    UAE is also known for the palm-shaped islands, beautiful beaches, huge shopping malls, and cultural and sports hub. Aside from the rich natural deposits, the UAE feature well-developed architecture, and infrastructure. Also, the federation offers a promising economy.

    Information About Entry and Departure

    Depending on your nationality, you can either get a visa on arrival or have to apply to get a visa. You can check at Visit Dubai what category your nationality is in.

    Nationals and residents in the UAE can apply online and acquire 90-day /30-day UAE entry permits or visit visas for their families, friends, and relatives through the Ministry’s website- eServices section

    If you are a national citizen of one of the GCC countries, you don’t need a visa or a sponsor to visit the UAE. However, foreigners accompanying the GCC nationals, or GCC expatriate residents must obtain an online visa upfront before arriving to the UAE.

    q

    Safety

    Generally, the United Arab Emirates are rather safe for expats, tourists, and travelers. The crime rate is very low and both men and women can move in public with little difficulty. Still, there are some things to keep in mind when you move to Abu Dhabi or Dubai or decide to travel around the country, in order to stay safe. Scams are quite common. Some of them are just specific ways of begging for money others are directed to getting your credit card or phone.

    Money

    UAE’s official currency is the Emirati Dirham. The notes in circulation are Dhs 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000. Be warned that the brown Dhs1,000 note looks a lot like Dhs200. Generally, it’s good to carry Dhs100 notes and lower values for day-to-day transactions.

    Banks are the best places to change foreign currency and traveller’s cheques into dirhams, however, are the numerous exchanges found in malls.

    Major international credit and debit cards are accepted in large shops, restaurants, and hotels. When shopping in souks, it’s better to bargain for the ‘best price’ with cash.

    WI-FI

    The average download speed in UAE is roughly 13.43 Mbps, while the average upload speed is 3.64 Mbps.

    For an average user who consumes about 5GB data in a month, both Etisalat and Du offer plans for around Dh200 per month making it Dh40 per 1GB data. However, for someone who only consumes 1GB data per month, you will end up paying Dh100 on both carriers.

    Mobile Internet

    The Du Visitor Mobile Line (VML) is a prepaid mobile line specially designed for tourists or business travelers visiting the UAE. It gives all the benefits of a mobile line, allowing you to stay in touch with your friends and relatives in the UAE or abroad.

    The Visitor Mobile Line costs Dhs 35 (approx. $9.54) and is loaded with 20 flexible minutes (national or international), 20 flexible SMS (national or international) and 200 MB of data. All benefits are valid 7 days from the time of line activation and minutes used to make international calls are applicable for 175 destinations.

    Another option is the Etisalat visitor line gives you instant connectivity, rich pack selection, hassle free experience and access to the widest 3G & 4G network in the UAE. For just Dhs 100, get started with the Visitor Line and subscribe to any one of the below packs, with which you can talk, surf and text as you need.

    The Visitor line is valid for 90 days and it can be extended for 90 more days for Dhs10. The Visitor Line packs are valid for 14 days and can be re-purchased for Dhs 75.

    MiFi

    Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

    Living in the UAE as a Digital Nomad

    As the UAE collects only 5% VAT, some purchases, such as electronic goods, can be very affordable. Also, the associated import tax is relatively low. The same goes for regional, everyday products such as groceries. These also tend to be of a very high quality.

    On the other hand, other things may be a bit more expensive, especially everyday products which need to be imported. This goes especially for products of well-known brands. Designer clothes can be very expensive in the United Arab Emirates, even more so than elsewhere.

    Average monthly rent in a decent area costs around 6,170 (1,679.75 USD) Dirham while 8,173 (2,225 USD) in a higher-end neighborhood.

    The most popular mode of public transportation in the UAE is the taxi. While buses not only operate within each individual Emirate, you can also travel between the different Emirates by bus.

    With its iconic skylines of high-rises and world famous beach resorts, the United Arab Emirates has become a favorite for family holidays and city breaks. Landmark tourist attractions such as Dubai’s towering Burj Khalifa and Abu Dhabi’s modern Sheikh Zayed Mosque, have branded the UAE as an up-to-the-minute luxury destination.

    Coworking Spaces

    The Bureau Dubai: The Bureau Dubai is a Co-Working space located in Souk Al Bahar Downtown Dubai. They offer a complete one stop solution to setting up a company in Dubai by either sponsoring or partnering with you, obtaining a license and all within their trendy furnished offices and facilities on affordable payment terms.

    NEST Dubai: NEST is one of the world’s first fully integrated co-working spaces within a worldwide branded hotel. The space is designed to fit the needs of the modern worker and offers a comfortable and flexible workspace that inspires and supports the need for networking and productivity. NEST perfectly pairs business and hospitality to enhance the workplace experience.

    Blog Posts About The UAE

    I spent three weeks in Dubai doing house sitting, a day in Abu Dhabi visiting the Grand Mosque and three days in the northernmost Emirate RAK.

    20 important words/sentences in Arabic:

    Hellomarhabaan
    Yesnem fielaan
    Nola
    Thank you!shakar!
    Pleaseraja’
    Excuse me…efu…
    Where is …?‘ayn hu….?
    My name is …?aismi hu….?
    I don’t speak Arabic‘ana la ‘atahadath alearabia
    Do you speak English?hal tatahaddath al enklezyia?
    I’m German.‘ana min ‘almania
    Could you help me?

    hal yumkinuk musaeadatay?

    I need …aihtaj….
    Hungryjawean
    Thirstymutaeatish
    Waterma’an
    How much is this?kam thaman hadha?
    Beachshati bahr
    Mallmajmae tijariin
    Hospitalmustashfaa

    The Numbers in Arabic

    1wahid
    2ithnan
    3thalatha
    4arba’a
    5khamsa
    6sitta
    7sab’a
    8thamaniya
    9tis’a
    10‘ashra
    11ahada ‘ashar
    12ithna ‘ashar
    13thalatha ‘ashar
    14arba’a ‘ashar
    15khamsa ‘ashar

     

    16sitta ‘ashar
    17sab’a ‘ashar
    18thamaniya ‘ashar
    19tis’a ‘ashar
    20‘ishrun
    30thalathun
    40arba’un
    50khamsun
    60sittun
    70sab’un
    80thamanun
    90tis’un
    100mi’a
    1.000alf
    1.000.000million

     

    The Dubai Guide for Digital Nomads

    Dubai Guide for Digital Nomads

    Live Like a Local

    Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in the Middle East? You should check out Dubai!

    Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

    You could also be interested in the following destinations for digital nomads:

    Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    ISRAEL

    Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    SINGAPORE
    Spanien für digitale Nomaden
    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
    MALAYSIA

    Hungary for Digital Nomads

    Hungary for Digital Nomads

    Destinations for Nomads

    When I got to Budapest, it didn’t take long until I realized what a gem this city is. After staying there for a month, I understood that this is my favorite city in Europe: Great Wi-Fi, low costs of living, a perfect location to travel surrounding countries, and an amazing community with many events and coworking spaces. What can a nomad desire more?

    p

    Facts About the Hungary

    Hungary is a country of unique beauty in the heart of Europe. With its size of 93 thousand square kilometres and its location at the border of Eastern and Western Europe, the country is an optimal choice for doing business by small and multinational companies.

    While the Hungarian language may not be similar to any other European language, the country has extensive and historically established relations with all three main European ethnic and linguistic families: the Indo-European, the Slavic, and the Neo-Latin languages. For this reason, Hungary is especially capable of acting as a bridge between various cultures.

    Located at the juncture of the 4 main European transport corridors, Hungary offers around 1,300 km motorway, an extensive railway network, and five airports.

     

    Information About Entry and Departure

    Traveling to the EU has never been more organized and stress-free. Due to the Schengen Agreement, citizens of certain countries are allowed to travel visa free among other Schengen states, meanwhile, citizens of non Schengen countries can travel throughout the Schengen states with the so-called Schengen Visa.

    A Schengen visa will allow you to stay within the Schengen zone for a maximum of 90 days.

    q

    Safety

    Take sensible precautions against petty crime. Bag snatching and pickpocketing are common, especially in Budapest. Be particularly careful on busy public transport, in train stations, at markets and at other places frequented by tourists. Theft of and from vehicles is common. Don’t carry large amounts of cash.

    Money

    Hungary’s official currency is the Hungarian Forint. It is possible to pay using Euro in Hungary, but the conversion rates are often not very favourable. Some larger hotels and tourist shops will even quote prices in both Euro and HUF, and the Euro price quoted might well be more expensive. If you don’t want to get HUF, you may try using your card. Small shops, restaurants, and cafes will only accept HUF. Other currencies won’t likely be accepted.

    In Hungary, it’s possible to exchange money at a hotel, airport, bank, or exchange bureau. The good news is that Hungary is a bit different than in other countries – exchange bureaus often charge fair prices. Bureaus charge a mandatory 0.3% commission, but largely won’t charge additional fees.

    ATMs are easy to find in Hungary, especially in larger cities; they will dispense forints at the mid-market exchange rate, but you may also be charged a foreign transaction fee. Currency exchange is available at banks for a surcharge. Hotels and airports will often charge a 10-15% commission on what you withdraw, so avoid them.

    WI-FI

    Wi-Fi in Budapest is pretty fast. I had stable and fast Wi-Fi in all the coworking spaces, cafés, and Airbnbs that I tested.

    Mobile Internet

    At the moment, Budapest has three mobile carriers:

    • (Magyar) Telekom
    • Telenor
    • Vodafone

    All providers have opened 4G/LTE to their prepaid users.

    You can buy a SIM card at any provider shop, just don’t forget your ID for registering. Also, give yourself some time to complete the process—the signatures and paperwork for prepaid cards can take a while.

    When you want to top up your Hungarian SIM card, simply bring your phone number to one of the shops. Remember to have it on hand for that.

    Hungary is part of the European Union, and if you have another EU carrier, you should be able to roam internationally at domestic rates. The motto is ‘roam like at home’.

    MiFi

    Another possibility for mobile internet access is a MiFi device, which creates a WiFi network for you. I have tested the GlocalMe device and think it’s a really useful addition of my travel equipment. You can either use it as an ordinary wireless router with up to two SIM cards (very useful if you work with mobile TANs, you want to be available on your local number or if you want to use the social networks with a 2-factor authentication) but you can also use it without a physical SIM card but with the built in cloudSIM technology (which is of course more expensive) in over 100 countries worldwide. Apart from that it’s also a 6000 mAh powerbank, which is never bad to have with you.

    Living in Hungary as a Digital Nomad

    As one of the most affordable European countries to live in, Hungary has a low cost of living which makes it appealing to many.

    When it comes to tourist attractions Hungary is not at all shy, showcasing an abundance of places to see and things to do. There are plenty of opportunities for enriching cultural experiences, from viewing historical monuments dating back to Roman Empires to visiting renowned UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

    Hungary’s location in the center of Europe makes it easy to travel to other European countries, especially neighboring countries like Austria, Slovakia, Slovenia, Serbia, Romania, and Croatia.

    Budapest showcases some excellent nightlife and entertainment like a “night party on the Danube”, fantastic festivals, the State Opera House, spa parties in the Széchenyi during summer and rejuvenating thermal baths to soothe your mind and body, to name a few. There is a wide selection of local eateries as well as regular to high-end restaurants.

    Coworking Spaces

    KáptarA coworking space that’s constantly developing over time, KAPTÁR believes that an active working space leads to producing great results. There’s a possibility for you here to create a unique way of working in comparison to the usual day in an everyday office.

    Impact Hub BudapestLocated in a beautiful turn-of-the-century building at the very heart of the city, we are so much more than just a co-working space. We are the new home for valuable connections, meaningful collaboration, business innovation, and an inspiring environment.

    Blog Posts About Hungary

    I spent three weeks in Dubai doing house sitting, a day in Abu Dhabi visiting the Grand Mosque and three days in the northernmost Emirate RAK.

    Sunrise in Budapest in Hungary

    Sunrise in Budapest in Hungary

    The sunrise in Budapest was so beautiful that I went to see it twice. Normally, I'm crazy in love with sunsets! I can’t get enough of seeing sunsets and watching photos of them! And probably one of the reasons to become a digital nomad was to be...

    20 important words/sentences in Hungarian:

    HelloHelló
    YesIgen
    NoNem
    Thank you!Kösz!
    PleaseKérem
    Excuse me…

    elnézést...

    Where is …?Hol van….?
    My name is …?A nevem ….?
    I don’t speak HungarianNem magyarul beszélek.
    Do you speak English?Beszélsz jobbat?
    I’m German.Németországból vagyok.
    Could you help me?Tudna nekem segíteni?
    I need …Szükségem van ….
    HungryÉhes
    ThirstySzomjas
    WaterVíz
    How much is this?Mennyibe kerül ez?
    BeachStrand
    MallBevásárló központ
    HospitalKórház

     

    The Numbers in Hungarian

    1egy
    2kettő
    3három
    4négy
    5öt
    6hat
    7hét
    8nyolc
    9kilenc
    10tíz
    11tizenegy
    12tizenkettő
    13tizenhárom
    14tizennégy
    15tizenöt

     

    16tizenhat
    17tizenhét
    18tizennyolc
    19tizenkilenc
    20húsz
    30harminc
    40negyven
    50ötven
    60hatvan
    70hetven
    80nyolcvan
    90kilencven
    100száz
    1.000ezer
    1.000.000millió

     

    The Budapest Guide for Digital Nomads

    Budapest Guide for Digital Nomads

    Live Like a Local

    Are you searching for a cool spot for digital nomads in Europe? You should check out Budapest in Hungary!

    Subscribe to my newsletter so I can keep you posted about my life of travels and as a digital nomad! You will never miss a new blog post, a new ebook or where my next adventure is going to bring us. Because it’s never going to be boring!

    Jerusalem – Israel für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    ROMANIA
    Rio de Janeiro – Brasilien für digitale Nomaden

    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS

    ITALY
    Spanien für digitale Nomaden
    DESTINATIONS FOR DIGITAL NOMADS
    SPAIN